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<div id="box">
<p class="b">item 1</p>
<p class="b">item 2</p>
<p class="b">item 3</p>
<p class="b">item 4</p>
<p class="b">item 5</p>
</div> 

How to bold the selected paragraph after clicked? For example, if I click 'item 2', only the item 2 will bold after I clicked

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4  
What have you tried? See ask advice, please. –  John Conde Mar 4 '13 at 14:39
    
click "item2" when "item 2" is not a link? then the only solution would be JS, otherwise CSS would do the job for you –  Mark Mar 4 '13 at 14:40
    
I have tried using css. #box p.static:active{ font-weight: 800; } The specified paragraph bold but only for a while, i want permanent after click a paragraph. –  user1761325 Mar 4 '13 at 14:43
    
whats wrong with onclick="this.style.fontWeight = 'bold'" ? he didnt said its a website or app so i assume there is no bad practice. –  Toping Mar 4 '13 at 15:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd suggest:

function makeBold(el) {
    el.style.fontWeight = 'bold';
}

var paragraphs = document.getElementsByTagName('p');

for (var i = 0, len = paragraphs.length; i<len; i++){
    paragraphs[i].onclick = function(){
        makeBold(this);
    };
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Or, if you'd prefer to toggle the font-weight:

function toggleBold(el) {
    el.style.fontWeight = el.style.fontWeight == 'bold' ? 'normal' : 'bold';
}

var paragraphs = document.getElementsByTagName('p');

for (var i = 0, len = paragraphs.length; i<len; i++){
    paragraphs[i].onclick = function(){
        toggleBold(this);
    };
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Or, if you'd prefer to have only one paragraph in bold text (clicking a second paragraph returns other p elements to a non-bold state):

function toggleBold(el) {
    var siblings = el.parentNode.getElementsByTagName('p');
    for (var i = 0, len = siblings.length; i<len; i++){
        if (siblings[i] == el){
            el.style.fontWeight = el.style.fontWeight == 'bold' ? 'normal' : 'bold';
        }
        else {
            siblings[i].style.fontWeight = 'normal';
        }
    }
}

var paragraphs = document.getElementsByTagName('p');

for (var i = 0, len = paragraphs.length; i<len; i++){
    paragraphs[i].onclick = function(){
        toggleBold(this);
    };
}

JS Fiddle demo.

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I have tried it. It is worked in the JS Fiddle. But not at chrome. –  user1761325 Mar 4 '13 at 14:54
    
It does work in Chrome, that's the browser I wrote this answer in. Have you placed your script element at the bottom of the page, before the closing </body> tag? Does the DOM exist at the point at which your JavaScript is running? –  David Thomas Mar 4 '13 at 14:57
    
Third solution is definitely what I wanted. But still, it is not working at chrome. I did place the <script> tag before closing </body>. The is another answer posted by Jameson is worked for me... but not like the solution you gave in the third one. –  user1761325 Mar 4 '13 at 15:09
    
Can you reproduce at JS Fiddle? Include the relevant (simplified/sscce) mark-up from with the body element. There's no reason (that I can see) that it shouldn't work, so possibly there's something else wrong that's causing problems. –  David Thomas Mar 4 '13 at 15:11
    
jsfiddle.net/davidThomas/aA5g8/2 This is the working in JS Fiddle, but still not at my chrome?? why? –  user1761325 Mar 4 '13 at 15:22
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with jQuery:

$('.b').click(function(){
  $(this).css({'font-weight':'bold'})
})
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Try this:

HTML:

<p class="b" onclick="GetBold(this)">item 2</p>

JavaScript:

function GetBold(current)
{
   var array = document.getElementsByClassName('p');

   for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
   {
        array[i].style.fontWeight = 'normal';
   }

   current.style.fontWeight = 'bold';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't suggest in-line JavaScript; it works, yes, but it's terribly intrusive on the mark-up and an absolute nightmare to maintain once you've got more than one or two functions to run. It really isn't worth the pain (this is just advice, rather than down-voting). –  David Thomas Mar 4 '13 at 14:59
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