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i was making some optimizations to an algorithm that finds the smallest number that is bigger than X, in a given array, but then a i stumbled on a strange difference. On the code bellow, the "ForeachUpper" ends in 625ms, and the "ForUpper" ends in, i believe, a few hours (insanely slower). Why so?

  class Teste
{
    public double Valor { get; set; }

    public Teste(double d)
    {
        Valor = d;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "Teste: " + Valor;
    }
}

  private static IEnumerable<Teste> GetTeste(double total)
    {
        for (int i = 1; i <= total; i++)
        {
            yield return new Teste(i);
        }
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int total = 1000 * 1000*30 ;
        double test = total/2+.7;

        var ieTeste = GetTeste(total).ToList();


        Console.WriteLine("------------");

        ForeachUpper(ieTeste.Select(d=>d.Valor), test);
        Console.WriteLine("------------");
        ForUpper(ieTeste.Select(d => d.Valor), test);
        Console.Read();
    }

    private static void ForUpper(IEnumerable<double> bigList, double find)
    {
        var start1 = DateTime.Now;

        double uppper = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < bigList.Count(); i++)
        {
            var toMatch = bigList.ElementAt(i);
            if (toMatch >= find)
            {
                uppper = toMatch;
                break;
            }
        }

        var end1 = (DateTime.Now - start1).TotalMilliseconds;

        Console.WriteLine(end1 + " = " + uppper);
    }

    private static void ForeachUpper(IEnumerable<double> bigList, double find)
    {
        var start1 = DateTime.Now;

        double upper = 0;
        foreach (var toMatch in bigList)
        {
            if (toMatch >= find)
            {
                upper = toMatch;
                break;
            }
        }

        var end1 = (DateTime.Now - start1).TotalMilliseconds;

        Console.WriteLine(end1 + " = " + upper);
    }

Thanks

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I believe this is a possible duplicate Click here to see [Duplicate][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/44220/… –  SpaceApple Mar 4 '13 at 15:27
2  
BTW, use the Stopwatch class. –  SLaks Mar 4 '13 at 15:27
    
why do you break from the if ? –  Ofiris Mar 4 '13 at 15:28
1  
@HighCore: And that's why we get questions that want to do everything in LINQ, even though a foreach would be better. Don't forget for and foreach. Just learn when to use each of the tools you are provided with. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 4 '13 at 15:31
3  
@Alex That is O(n*log(n)) rather than O(n). You don't need to sort the whole thing to just get the min/max value. Oh, and if you do the filtering first you make all operations that follow quicker, rather than doing the filtering at the very end. –  Servy Mar 4 '13 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 31 down vote accepted

IEnumerable<T> is not indexable.

The Count() and ElementAt() extension methods that you call in every iteration of your for loop are O(n); they need to loop through the collection to find the count or the nth element.

Moral: Know thy collection types.

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5  
+1 for the moral section –  Adrian Carneiro Mar 4 '13 at 15:31
    
Regardign Count() worth noting that it depends on an actual collection type, if it implements ICollection with Count property Count() will use it –  sll Mar 4 '13 at 15:42
1  
@sll: That's true for ElementAt, too. The big differences will go away if the OP would add a .ToArray() after the Select. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 4 '13 at 15:47
    
Funny thing is that this means that an algorithm like quicksort/binarysearch can easily be outmatched by a simple foreach, when the source collection is an enumerable. –  WoF_Angel Mar 4 '13 at 17:02
    
@WoF_Angel: To state that more correctly, you should not use for with arbitrary IEnumerable<T>s. –  SLaks Mar 4 '13 at 19:33

The reason for this difference is that your for loop will execute bigList.Count() at every iteration. This is really costly in your case, because it will execute the Select and iterate the complete result set.

Furthermore, you are using ElementAt which again executes the select and iterates it up to the index you provided.

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