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I have three concrete classes-

public class ClassA{
    public C1 processA(C1 c1){
        //lots of ugly code that copies
        //one field to another
        //return c1
    }
    public List<C1> processA(List<C1> c1s){
        //iterate over c1s
            //call process(c1)
            //add returned value to list

        //return list
    }
}


public class ClassB{
    public C2 processB(C2 c2, C3 c3){
        //lots of ugly code that copies
        //one field to another
        //return c2
    }
    public List<C2> processB(List<Pair<C2, C3> pairs){
        //iterate over pairs
            //call process(c2, c3)
            //add returned value to list

        //return list
    }
}

public class ClassC{
    public C4 processC(C4 c4, C5 c5, C1 c1){
        //lots of ugly code that copies
        //one field to another
        //return c4
    }
    public List<C4> processC(List<Triple<C4, C5, C1> triples){
        //iterate over triples
            //call process(c4, c5, c1)
            //add returned value to list

        //return list
    }
}

I would like to remove duplication in the process(List...) methods. I don't care about the processA(C1), processB(C2,C3), processC(C4,C5,C1) methods, they will remain the same. What are my options in refactoring this code?

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5  
Start refactoring from renaming methods, variables and type names. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 4 '13 at 15:35
2  
Change your variable and method names. This would by my first step. –  Lukas Knuth Mar 4 '13 at 15:35
1  
Create an interface and override process() –  noMAD Mar 4 '13 at 15:36
    
shouldn't all your 2nd constructors return some Collection as your comment says, return list everywhere. –  R.J Mar 4 '13 at 15:40
    
Indeed. Thanks!. I have corrected that. –  user869081 Mar 4 '13 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

Beside the code duplication, I see two other problems with the code, which you can address to eliminate the code smell of duplication:

  1. Tight coupling of several classes. Though I can't affirm this without knowledge of the domain of these classes and their actual descriptive names, seeing that C1-C5 are related enough for property-copying to be a valid operation, I think a good place to start is to reconsider the design of those classes. For example, can they be composed so that properties shared by C1-C5 can always be stored with a new bean class?
  2. Multiple ways of doing the same thing, or, in traditional OOD terminology, it's lacking "separation of concerns". These classes are not only concerned with transforming (C3 to C2, etc.), but also collecting the results of an operation over a collection. Consider separating the latter concern out, perhaps by simply letting the client using a more general collections solution such as apache collection's Collections.collect(). Because class A and B are trying to do multiple things for the user, you have multiple methods for single items and for collections. (It may be interesting to note that in a functional language like scala or groovy, the general collections solution would be more elegant and concise, reducing the need for convenience methods like these.)
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