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Is there a way to decorate a method that will do some logging, then throw an exception unconditionally, as such?

I have code like this:

void foo(out int x)
{
  if( condition() ) { x = bar(); return; }

  // notice that x is not yet set here, but compiler doesn't complain

  throw new Exception( "missed something." );
}

If I try writing it like this I get a problem:

void foo(out int x)
{
  if( condition() ) { x = bar(); return; }

  // compiler complains about x not being set yet

  MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException( "missed something." );
}

Any suggestions? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What problem do you get? –  Chris Ballance Oct 5 '09 at 14:51
    
"x has out attribute and hasn't been set yet at the end of method" –  k0dek0mmand0 Oct 5 '09 at 14:52
1  
I'm confused - how is it thrown unconditionally if it doesn't get thrown when x is set (and a return is done) –  Matt Oct 5 '09 at 14:53
    
I want to mark MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException as a method that always throws an exception, not the foo method. –  k0dek0mmand0 Oct 5 '09 at 14:54
    
I wonder where that answer with the guard clause went. I thought it was a better answer to just reverse the logic. –  Brandon Oct 5 '09 at 14:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

How about this?

bool condition() { return false; }
int bar() { return 999; }
void foo(out int x)
{
    if (condition()) { x = bar(); return; }
    // compiler complains about x not being set yet 
    throw MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException("missed something.");
}
Exception MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException(string message)
{
    //this could also be a throw if you really want 
    //   but if you throw here the stack trace will point here
    return new Exception(message);
}
share|improve this answer

If you know the exception will always be thrown, why does it matter. Just set the variable to something so it can compile:

void foo(out int x)
{
  if( condition() ) { x = bar(); return; }

  x = 0;

  MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException( "missed something." );
}
share|improve this answer
3  
That's exactly the thing I wanted to avoid doing. :) –  k0dek0mmand0 Oct 5 '09 at 14:53

There's no way of marking a method in this way.

Possibly irrelevant, but the pattern in your example, using an out parameter, is a bit odd. Why not just have a return type on the method instead?

int Foo()
{
    if (condition()) return bar();

    MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException("missed something.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
That was just a simple example. The actual code is rather more complex. –  k0dek0mmand0 Oct 5 '09 at 14:57
    
@k0dek0mmand0: I suspected that might be the case. I guess you're out of luck - there's no way to tell the compiler that MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException always throws. –  LukeH Oct 5 '09 at 14:59

It's a very old thread but I just want to add you should write it different from the start:

void foo(out int x)
{
    if (!condition()) 
        MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException("missed something.");

    x = bar();
    // and so on...
}

That way compiler won't complain and your code is much more clear.

share|improve this answer

x is an out parameter and must be set before you move forward

share|improve this answer
3  
unless an exception is thrown –  k0dek0mmand0 Oct 5 '09 at 14:55
1  
It is still good policy to ensure that any out parameters are set early on in the method and assign defaults to them if not. –  Chris Ballance Oct 5 '09 at 15:00

If you don't want to have to set x, why don't you just use a ref parameter instead?

void foo(ref int x)
{
  if( condition() ) { x = bar(); return; }

  // nobody complains about anything

  MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException( "missed something." );
}
share|improve this answer

It doesn't answer your question but when using out parameters it is always a good idea to initialize them in the beginning of the method. This way you won't have any compiler errors:

void foo(out int x)
{
    x = 0;
    if( condition() ) { x = bar(); return; }
    MyMethodThatAlwaysThrowsAnException( "missed something." );
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I think out parameters should be assigned where it makes sense or as it may prevent some hidden bugs at compile time just because you forgot to assign out parameter at some code path. –  Dzmitry Huba Oct 5 '09 at 14:57

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