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I have a test that I expected to pass but the behavior of the Garbage Collector is not as I presumed:

[Test]
public void WeakReferenceTest2()
{
    var obj = new object();
    var wRef = new WeakReference(obj);

    wRef.IsAlive.Should().BeTrue(); //passes

    GC.Collect();

    wRef.IsAlive.Should().BeTrue(); //passes

    obj = null;

    GC.Collect();

    wRef.IsAlive.Should().BeFalse(); //fails
}

In this example the obj object should be GC'd and therefore I would expect the WeakReference.IsAlive property to return false.

It seems that because the obj variable was declared in the same scope as the GC.Collect it is not being collected. If I move the obj declaration and initialization outside of the method the test passes.

Does anyone have any technical reference documentation or explanation for this behavior?

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1  
Have you checked what the IL code looks like? Also, does it behave the same way for release and debug builds? –  Matthew Watson Mar 4 '13 at 16:15
3  
My initial guess is that compiler/runtime/processor optimizations are biting you. They realize you're never reading obj so it's allowed to re-order the operations among the other method calls. Try adding something like Console.WriteLine(obj == null) just to prevent the compiler from doing that. –  Servy Mar 4 '13 at 16:15
1  
This sample works fine on my machine. I'm using Console.WriteLine to log the IsAlive parameter though instead of Should() –  JaredPar Mar 4 '13 at 16:15
4  
Worth noting that it is not guaranteed that no strong reference to the object exists at that point. You should not be writing code that assumes the garbage collector will kill an object at any given time. –  Jonathan Grynspan Mar 4 '13 at 16:20
    
From MSDN (emphasis mine): "Use this method to try to reclaim all memory that is inaccessible." –  user7116 Mar 4 '13 at 16:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Could it be that the .Should() extension method is somehow hanging on to a reference? Or perhaps some other aspect of the test framework is causing this issue.

(I'm posting this as an answer otherwise I can't easily post the code!)

I have tried the following code, and it works as expected (Visual Studio 2012, .Net 4 build, debug and release, 32 bit and 64 bit, running on Windows 7, quad core processor):

using System;

namespace Demo
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var obj = new object();
            var wRef = new WeakReference(obj);

            GC.Collect();
            obj = null;
            GC.Collect();

            Console.WriteLine(wRef.IsAlive); // Prints false.
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

What happens when you try this code?

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2  
If Should is holding onto a reference, it would need to be in a static variable, otherwise it will have gone out of scope and be garbage collected. –  Servy Mar 4 '13 at 16:22
    
Agreed, and that seems unlikely. But without seeing the source code for it, I have to assume the possibility. Although I think really it's just "undefined behaviour" with respect to the timing of when nulled-out references actually become garbage collectable, as you suggested. –  Matthew Watson Mar 4 '13 at 16:28
    
The "Should" is from the FluentAssertions library. I get the same behavior using Assert.False instead. –  TechnoTone Mar 4 '13 at 20:55
    
Thanks Matthew. Confirmed that this does work for me too. So the issue is really a result of the compiler optimizations. I wonder if it's possible to disable the relevant optimizations for my test so that I can make a true-to-life test scenario...? –  TechnoTone Mar 4 '13 at 21:16

There are a few potential issues I can see:

  • I am unaware of anything in the C# specification which requires that the lifetimes of local variables be limited. In a non-debug build, I think the compiler would be free to omit the last assignment to obj (setting it to null) since no code path would cause the value of obj will never be used after it, but I would expect that in a non-debug build the metadata would indicate that the variable is never used after the creation of the weak reference. In a debug build, the variable should exist throughout the function scope, but the obj = null; statement should actually clear it. Nonetheless, I'm not certain that the C# spec promises that the compiler won't omit the last statement and yet still keep the variable around.

  • If you are using a concurrent garbage collector, it would may be that GC.Collect() triggers the immediate start of a collection, but that the collection wouldn't actually be completed before GC.Collect() returns. In this scenario, it may not be necessary to wait for all finalizers to run, but and thus GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() may be overkill, but it would probably solve the problem.

  • When using the standard garbage collector, I would not expect the existence of a weak reference to an object to prolong the existence of the object in the way that a finalizer would, but when using a concurrent garbage collector, it's possible that abandoned objects to which a weak reference exists get moved to a queue of objects with weak references that need to be cleaned up, and that the processing of such cleanup happens on a separate thread that runs concurrently with everything else. In such case, a call to GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() would be necessary to achieve the desired behavior.

Note that one should generally not expect that weak references will be invalidated with any particular degree of timeliness, nor should one expect that fetching Target after IsAlive reports true will yield a non-null reference. One should use IsAlive only in cases where one wouldn't care about the target if it's still alive, but would be interested in knowing that the reference has died. For example, if one has a collection of WeakReference objects, one may wish to periodically iterate through the list and remove WeakReference objects whose target has died. One should be prepared for the possibility that WeakReferences might remain in the collection longer than would be ideally necessary; the only consequence if they do so should be a slight waste of memory and CPU time.

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As far as I know, calling Collect does not guarantee that all resources are released. You are merely making a suggestion to the garbage collector.

You could try to force it to block until all objects are released by doing this:

GC.Collect(2, GCCollectionMode.Forced, true);

I expect that this might not work absolutely 100% of the time. In general, I would avoid writing any code that depends on observing the garbage collector, it is not really designed to be used in this way.

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