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Is there any serialization framework for Javascript which would retain class and reference information like Python pickles? I.e. one could directly take a prototypial inherited class instance (not just JSON-like data) and serialize it like::

 // Somehow add serialization metadata to classes first
 obj = new MyObject();
 obj.referred = new MyObject2();
 pickle = serializer.dump(obj) // Provides byte stream of the serialized object  

The serializer could take care of

  • Encoding class information in the pickle - this should be somehow customizable due to different JS class systems in existence

  • Automatically follow and serialize referred objects

  • Provide hooks to add custom encoders/decoders for values (dates being the most common case)

This would making internal storing and transferring of complex data structures little bit easier. I am hoping to use this in a game engine. Like with pickles, the deserialization of data would not be possible without the orignal Javascript code providing the class definitions.

What kind of such frameworks exist for Javascript already exist or I am going to need to roll-out a custom system?

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What did you end up using? I'm looking for a similar solution... –  Nick Dima Jan 27 at 16:27
    
occamsrazor.js (see the first answer) is the best IMHO, though only semi-automatic –  Mikko Ohtamaa Jan 27 at 20:33
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It doesn't fit perfectly but you can try to use occamsrazor.js . Doing this you can use JSON serialization:

// this is your costructor function
function Circle(attrs){
    this.radius = attrs.radius;
}
Circle.prototype.area = function (){
    return this.radius*this.radius*Math.PI;
}
Circle.prototype.perimeter = function (){
    return 2*this.radius*Math.PI;
}

// this is a validator
function hasRadius(obj){
    return radius in obj;
}

// this is your factory function
objFactory = occamsrazor().addContructor(hasRadius, Circle);

// this is your deserialized object
var json = '{"radius": 10}';

// circle now is a full fledged object
var circle = objFactory(JSON.parse(json));

The drawback is that you don't get a snapshot of an object like using pickle, you recreate a new object. But it may be convenient in some circunstances.

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Thanks. If one needs to implement such system it is best to build on the top of occamrazor.js :) –  Mikko Ohtamaa Mar 5 '13 at 13:58
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You might want to look at hunterloftis/cryo. From the readme:

Built for node.js and browsers. Cryo is inspired by Python's pickle and works similarly to JSON.stringify() and JSON.parse(). Cryo.stringify() and Cryo.parse() improve on JSON in these circumstances:

  • Undefined
  • Date
  • Infinity
  • Object references
  • Attached properties
  • Functions
  • DOM Nodes

There is a brief discussion with the author at r/programming.

The source is straightforward, no magic.

I haven't tried it yet.

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Check out msgpack. While I have not used it for JavaScript objects, the example seems to imply that it will work for objects and not just JSONs. An added bonus: it's one of the fastest implementations that I've ever used for serialization.

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I checked msgpack and I did not found examples for full Javascript objects :( –  Mikko Ohtamaa Mar 5 '13 at 13:38
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http://nanodeath.github.com/HydrateJS/ (blog article at http://blog.maxaller.name/2011/01/hydratejs-smarter-javascript-serialization) seems to fit some of your requirements, judging in particular by https://github.com/nanodeath/HydrateJS/blob/master/spec/HydrateSpec.js

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Not exactly I was looking for, but at least there is a good codebase to start working flatting the object graph and so on :) –  Mikko Ohtamaa Mar 13 '13 at 16:36
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