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Can anyone explain to me how the parameter map will be affected in the following code if two threads access it at the same time. Is the map exposed to thread safety issues because it is not inside the synchronized block?

public void fun(String type, String name, Map<String, Object> parameters) {
    parameters.put(Constants.PARM_TYPE, type);
    parameters.put(Constants.PARM_NAME, name);
    try {
        synchronized (launcher) {
            launcher.launch(type, bool, parameters);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        logger.error("AHHHHH, the world has ended!",e);
    }
}

I have looked at the following but I'm still questioning it: Synchronized and the scope of visibility

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2  
yes, if that map is not thread-safe, all kinds of bad things can happen. –  jtahlborn Mar 4 '13 at 16:34
    
What you need is a BlockingMap implementation. –  alexg Mar 4 '13 at 16:34
    
@alexg what is a BlockingMap? Did you mean a ConcurrentMap? –  Matt Ball Mar 4 '13 at 16:35
    
parameters rock'n'roll, that will happen. –  m0skit0 Mar 4 '13 at 16:35
1  
So the parameters map is a separate instance in each thread so the values in the map should be fine I do believe. I believe the issue here would be the scope of the synchronization. I am debating on whether or not to make the method synchronized or keep it at the block level. It seems to me that even if the method parameters are unique to the thread that there could still be an issue at run time when executing this code. –  peekay Mar 4 '13 at 17:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your parameters instances are separate (as you mentioned in your last comment), then there is no problem with this code.

The method parameters - besides Map parameters - are just 2 Strings, so there are no synchronisation issues regarding them.

To put the synchronized block onto method level or on launcher: They're different objects. If you put on method, it will synchronize on this, otherwise on launcher. Since you want to protect the 'launcher', you have to "build the fence" as close as you can - so synchronizing on launcher is OK.

There is another technique which is using a Object lockObject = new Object(), and does the synchronization on that object, but for this purpuse I think it's overkill, but you can do that.

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Imagine if you had a shared Map.

private Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String,Object>();

that is being updated by many threads as displayed in your example.

new Thread(new Runnable(){
    public void run(){
        fun("a","b", map);
    }
}).start();
new Thread(new Runnable(){
    public void run(){
        fun("a","b", map);
    }
}).start();

Each thread may update the map at the same time which could lead to A Beautiful Race Condition

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1  
+1 Thanks for the beautiful link :) –  noMAD Mar 4 '13 at 17:45

If multiple threads have a handle to the same parameters instance and they call this method (which modifies the map) with a non-thread-safe map implementation, all kinds of bad things can/will happen (e.g. map corruption which may/may not manifest itself as exceptions like NullPointerException).

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Please be specific, what kind of exceptions. That's not a specific answer. –  GaborSch Mar 4 '13 at 16:45
    
@GaborSch - i was specific. "(e.g. map corruption)". there may not even be an exception. please don't vote on answers you don't understand. –  jtahlborn Mar 4 '13 at 16:45
    
But there may be even Exceptions. In this sense, even a ConcurrentModificationException can happen. So, your answer is as wrong as my answer was - so far. –  GaborSch Mar 4 '13 at 16:47
    
@GaborSch - sure, there may be exceptions. you could get random NullPointerExceptions, or other stuff. if you think my answer is factually incorrect fine. if you are just being spiteful, please remove your downvote. –  jtahlborn Mar 4 '13 at 16:50
    
@GaborSch - and no, there won't be CMEs cause those are only thrown during iteration (which isn't happening here). –  jtahlborn Mar 4 '13 at 16:51

Assuming multiple threads are accessing the method fun(), the way map works is if you insert the same key multiple times then the value of that key would be overridden each time. But this might not be the only problem. There could be race conditions and corruption issues too. If you want an implicitly thread safe data structure, I assume a HashTable will get your job done.

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if more than one thread executes that code concurrently passing the same object as the parameter map then you will have a race condition.

This will definitely cause thread safety issues unless you:

  • use the right Map implementation, based on your requirements and the Map implementation concurrent behavior (ConcurrentHashMap for instance, but this depends a lot on the actual requirements for your app)

  • or write thread safe code yourself (probably using synchronization primitives like 'synchronized').

IMPORTANT: Please notice that just moving the lines of code that modify the map into the synchronized block won't necessarily remove the race condition as you'll have to consider which other threads in your app may try to modify the map and which object they will use to synchronize their access to it. The code in the function is using a reference to 'launcher' to synchronize. Any other thread modifying the map without synchronization or with synchronization over an object different than 'launcher' will cause a race condition

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