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I have the following method:

namespace ListHelper
{
    public class ListHelper<T>
    {
        public static bool ContainsAllItems(List<T> a, List<T> b)
        {
            return b.TrueForAll(delegate(T t)
            {
                return a.Contains(t);
            });
        }
    }
}

The purpose of which is to determine if a List contains all the elements of another list. It would appear to me that something like this would be built into .NET already, is that the case and am I duplicating functionality?

Edit: My apologies for not stating up front that I'm using this code on Mono version 2.4.2.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 62 down vote accepted

If you're using .NET 3.5, it's easy:

public static bool ContainsAllItems(List<T> a, List<T> b)
{
    return !b.Except(a).Any();
}

This checks whether there are any elements in b which aren't in a - and then inverts the result.

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This is untested, but wouldn't return b.Except(a).Empty(); be much more readable ? –  Nils Oct 5 '09 at 15:13
4  
Except that Empty() doesn't return a boolean. It returns an IEnumerable<T> with no items. –  Peter Stephens Oct 5 '09 at 15:27
    
This requires Linq right? If so, I don't think that's available in Mono, which is what I'm using at the moment. –  Matt Haley Oct 5 '09 at 16:23
1  
You can use LINQ to Objects in Mono, I believe... but it would be helpful if you'd state the requirements in the question to start with. Which version of Mono are you using? –  Jon Skeet Oct 5 '09 at 16:37
    
I've just checked the sources for Mono 2.4.2.3, and it definitely includes LINQ to Objects. –  Jon Skeet Oct 5 '09 at 16:52

Just for fun, @JonSkeet's answer as an extension method:

/// <summary>
/// Does a list contain all values of another list?
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>Needs .NET 3.5 or greater.  Source:  http://stackoverflow.com/a/1520664/1037948 </remarks>
/// <typeparam name="T">list value type</typeparam>
/// <param name="containingList">the larger list we're checking in</param>
/// <param name="lookupList">the list to look for in the containing list</param>
/// <returns>true if it has everything</returns>
public static bool ContainsAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> containingList, IEnumerable<T> lookupList) {
    return ! lookupList.Except(containingList).Any();
}
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+1 for the extra work –  jeremy Feb 8 '13 at 12:30
1  
similarly: Contains Any = public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle) { return haystack.Intersect(needle).Count() > 0; }. I tried some quick performance comparisons to haystack.Count() - 1 >= haystack.Except(needle).Count(); and Intersect seemed to do better most of the time. –  drzaus May 23 '13 at 16:21
1  
sheesh...use Any() not Count() > 0: public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle) { return haystack.Intersect(needle).Any(); } –  drzaus Jun 4 '13 at 14:34

You could also use another way. Override equals and use this

public bool ContainsAll(List<T> a,List<T> check){

list l = new List<T>(check);
foreach(T _t in a){

if(check.Contains(t)){
check.Remove(t);
if(check.Count == 0){
return true;
}
}
return false;
}

}

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