Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have an array of objects where each object has several properties. Example:

[
   { text: 'test1',
     id: 1
   },
   { text: 'test2',
     id: 2
   }
]

What would be the best way to convert this to an array of strings that contains the value from text? I had thought I might be able to do this using underscore.js:

headerText = _.pick(headerRow, 'text');

But I think that since the objects are in an array this will not work. My next idea is to just loop through each element in the array and push the text value to a new array, but i'm curious if anyone knows of a more elegant way to do this? Suggestions?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're looking for Array#map:

var stringArray = headerRow.map(function(entry) {
    return entry.text;
});

Live Example | Source

You don't even need Underscore, Array#map is part of ES5 and fully supported by V8, the JavaScript engine used by Node. Array#map calls the function you give it once for each entry in the array, and builds a new array from the return values of that function.

Or if you want to change the existing array, you can use Array#forEach:

headerRow.forEach(function(entry, index) {
    headerRow[index] = entry.text;
});

Live Example | Source

share|improve this answer

Use _.map(headerRow, function(row) { return row.text; }). Array.map isn't available in IE < 9.

share|improve this answer
    
"Array.map isn't available in IE < 9." So? The OP says they're using Node. Node uses V8, which has Array#map. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 4 '13 at 16:53
2  
This is node.js (server side javascript) so IE 9 won't be an issue. –  Abe Miessler Mar 4 '13 at 16:53
    
Sorry; missed the tag. –  valtron Mar 4 '13 at 16:55

i'd use a foreach and just loop through it.

 var jamie = [
    { text: 'test1',
      id: 1
    },
    { text: 'test2',
      id: 2
    }
 ];

 var length = jamie.length,
     element = [];
 for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
   element[i] = jamie[i].id;
   // Do something with element i.
 }
   console.info(element);
share|improve this answer

This is a vanilla javascript version, which avoids using the not universally supported Array.map method.

// assign the array to a variable
var a = [
   { text: 'test1',
     id: 1
   },
   { text: 'test2',
     id: 2
   }
];

// loop through each item in the array, reassigning with it's text value
// not like this: for(i in a) a[i] = a[i].text
// but with a for loop based on the array length
var i;
for(i=a.length; i; i--){ a[i-1] = a[i-1].text; }

// check the results
console.log(a);
// ["test1", "test2"]
share|improve this answer
    
for(i=0;i<a.length;i++){stringArray.push(row.text)} –  Plato Mar 4 '13 at 16:54
    
Awww c'mon - what's the down-vote for this time? –  Billy Moon Mar 4 '13 at 17:01
    
Note: comment seems to have gone linking to why not to use for...in to enumerate arrays –  Billy Moon Mar 4 '13 at 17:02
    
for i in a could find undesired prototypical stuff –  Plato Mar 4 '13 at 17:10
    
@BillyMoon: I see a couple of possible reasons: 1. You never declare i and thus fall prey to The Horror of Implicit Globals, and 2. You're abusing the for loop (modifying the indexer in the test is an anti-pattern -- the downvoter probably thought the loop body saw the wrong i value, which is one reason it's best not to abuse the for loop). Then there's the fact you're relying on the horror that is Automatic Semicolon Insertion, but anyone who downvotes for that needs talking to. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Mar 4 '13 at 17:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.