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When I go to m.youtube.com on my iPhone (Chrome) to watch videos, I assume that YouTube is using the HTML5 <video> tag to display them.

However, when I watch a video with a commercial, dragging the seek button makes it jump back to it's original position before the seek. In other words, it is impossible to control your position in the commercial.

It feels like a violation of the divide between browser content and the browser. This isn't a native app, it is a website. How are the iOS video control elements being manipulated by HTML? It seems that this should be impossible, just like it should be impossible for a webpage to access a phone's photos or switch applications.

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I'm having trouble understanding this question - can you clarify a bit? Are you asking how iPhone controls mobile video, or why the controls are locked down on the commercials? – CodeMoose Mar 4 '13 at 17:26
    
I'm asking both, but specifically why the controls are locked down. – element119 Mar 4 '13 at 21:01
    
So, just to clarify - this is running inline in chrome, not using the native youtube app? – CodeMoose Mar 4 '13 at 22:23
    
Yes, this is running in Chrome for iOS. Try searching "CNN" and watching a video, a commercial will come up that you can't skip through. – element119 Mar 4 '13 at 22:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it's running inline in the browser, the site will have full script access to the controls - and it's very standard nowadays to prevent skipping/changing the playhead during ads. Some even get rid of the controls completely.

Though HTML5 video is a native browser function, it's still subject to javascript hooks. All one has to do is add return false to the onChangePlayhead event to lock the controls down. It's only when you remove the video from inline web and bring it into the native iOS app that it becomes untouchable by scripts.

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Followup: here's a list of all video attributes accessible to javascript while a video is playing with the native controls w3.org/2010/05/video/mediaevents.html. Really easy to throw script in to screw it up. – CodeMoose Mar 4 '13 at 22:38

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