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I was trying to implement 5-bit CRC with the CRC generator 100101. However, this code doesn't reflect the hardware Xor and shift registers in CRC; On the hardware level, we have the following :

enter image description here

How can this be implemented on python?

As a clarification, I was wondering if there is some code that deals with bit-wise xor and shift operators << as an approach to solve this

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what you are asking -- you code looks fine so far and, as you state, it gives the correct results.

I may point you to the collections.deque data structure in the Standard Library which I find quite useful to represent shift registers because it provides the rotate() method to do exactly this kind of circular shift.

This code give the same results as your code:

from collections import deque

deque_crc = deque([0,0,0,0,0],maxlen=5)

myID.extend(deque_crc)

for x in myID:
    deque_crc.rotate(-1)
    deque_crc[2] = (deque_crc[2] + deque_crc[4]) % 2
    deque_crc[4] = (deque_crc[4] + x) % 2

myID[-5:] = deque_crc

print myID

EDIT:

Since you are asking for a bitwise implementation of the algorithm you might want to checkout these sources:

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Thanks! As a clarification, I was wondering if there is some code that deals with bit-wise xor and shift operators << as an approach to solve this. but then i guess i cant deal with lists i think. (New to python) – Ever Mar 4 '13 at 19:12

If you want to really use CRC code (as opposed to studying their implementation) you may find the Python crcmod Module very useful. I have been using it for years and it is very easy to use. Just throw in the polynomial and get a CRC function ready to process your data.

It may however not support 5bit CRC polynomials.

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However, this code doesn't reflect the hardware Xor and shift registers in CRC;

It does!

This:

CRC[0] = CRC[1]
CRC[1] = CRC[2]
CRC[2] = CRC[3]
CRC[3] = CRC[4]
CRC[4] = input

is a model of a shift register.

The (Something+1) %2 is one way of representing the XOR operation.

I would argue you have pretty accurately modelled the diagram you show!

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