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I have the following data set:

PID,RUN_START_DATE,PUSHUP_START_DATE,SITUP_START_DATE,PULLUP_START_DATE
1,2013-01-24,2013-01-02,,2013-02-03
2,2013-01-30,2013-01-21,2013-01-13,2013-01-06
3,2013-01-29,2013-01-28,2013-01-01,2013-01-29
4,2013-02-16,2013-02-12,2013-01-04,2013-02-11
5,2013-01-06,2013-02-07,2013-02-25,2013-02-12
6,2013-01-26,2013-01-28,2013-02-12,2013-01-10
7,2013-01-26,,2013-01-12,2013-01-30
8,2013-01-03,2013-01-24,2013-01-19,2013-01-02
9,2013-01-22,2013-01-13,2013-02-03,
10,2013-02-06,2013-01-16,2013-02-07,2013-01-11

I know I can use numpy.argsort to return the sorted indexes of the values:

SQ_AL_INDX = numpy.argsort(df_sequence[['RUN_START_DATE', 'PUSHUP_START_DATE', 'SITUP_START_DATE', 'PULLUP_START_DATE']], axis=1)

...returns...

   RUN_START_DATE  PUSHUP_START_DATE  SITUP_START_DATE  PULLUP_START_DATE
0               2                  1                 0                  3
1               3                  2                 1                  0
2               2                  1                 0                  3
3               2                  3                 1                  0
4               0                  1                 3                  2
5               3                  0                 1                  2
6               1                  2                 0                  3
7               3                  0                 2                  1
8               3                  1                 0                  2
9               3                  1                 0                  2

But, it seems to put pandas.NaT values into the first position. So in this example where PID == 1 the sort order returns 2 1 0 3. But, the second index position is a pandas.Nat value.

How can I get the sorted indexes while skipping the pandas.NaT values (e.g., the return index values would be 2 1 np.NaN 3 or 2 1 pandas.NaT 3 or better yet 1 0 2 for PID 1 instead of 2 1 0 3)?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pass numpy.argsort to the apply method instead of using it directly. This way, NaNs/NaTs persist. For your example:

In [2]: df_sequence[['RUN_START_DATE', 'PUSHUP_START_DATE', 'SITUP_START_DATE', 'PULLUP_START_DATE']].apply(numpy.argsort, axis=1)
Out[2]: 
                RUN_START_DATE  PUSHUP_START_DATE  SITUP_START_DATE  PULLUP_START_DATE
0               1                  0               NaN               2
(etc.)
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Thank you so much for the help! When I run the code I get and odd result on lines with NaT on them. For line 0 I get the following: 0 1970-01-01 00:00:00 1970-01-01 00:00:00 2262-04-10 0:12:43.145224 1970-01-01 00:00:00. Line 6 and 8 are also wrong. I have put my code and the full result on pastebin: pastebin.com/qhhZzRGr –  BigHandsome Mar 4 '13 at 20:31
1  
can u show df.dtypes and your pandas version? this should work in 0.11, may not in 0.10.1; try on current master if u can –  Jeff Mar 4 '13 at 23:44
2  
thanks. I opened an issue because series.argsort() should work correctly. (I know u r using np.argsort) but that doesn't handle the NaT at all github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/2967 –  Jeff Mar 5 '13 at 1:31
1  
you are getting those funny looking times because they are the NaT presented in buggy numpy 1.6.2 (know display issue) - till we fix the above issue (and u use series.argsort), no easy workaround –  Jeff Mar 5 '13 at 1:40
1  
continued - except you could mask yourself (eg isnull(df)) then just ignore the true values - eg they have nans –  Jeff Mar 5 '13 at 1:42
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