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public class Test 
{
    //Car c = null; // Is this better and is it good to set it to null.

    public void A()
    {
        Car c = new Car();
    }

    public void B()
    {
        Car c = new Car();
    }

    public void C()
    {
        Car c = new Car();
    }
}

1) Can I just declare Object 0 globally at the top and use it in each method instead of creating a new one each time (Is this what I am actually doing?)

2) Is it a good idea to initially set the object to null?

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3  
Please revisit your code and post something that compiles. –  John Saunders Oct 5 '09 at 15:24
    
I quickly updated my code, don't know why this was downvoted. The main question is not about null, but mainly if re-declaration of objects will add to the size of my executable. –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:32
    
You should come back and take your time. You now have three local variables, none of which refer to the c class member object. –  John Saunders Oct 5 '09 at 15:40
    
I commented out the c class member object to show I am not using it. If I had it declared, I would remove the local variables and just do something c = new Car(); –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

FxCop states that you should avoid unnecessary initialising code, because it generates unnecessary IL, which affects performance. (Although I think that the performance hit is very minimal). Sometimes, I also explicitly initialize variables, just to make my code more clear.

To answer your first question: it's all a matter of what you're trying / wanting to do ...

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Thanks, this was the type of answer I was looking for. It seemed redundant to keep initializing the same object over and over again. Thanks again. –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:33
    
yeah, my C and C++ days make me initialize references to null, although I know it is unnecessary. –  Tamás Szelei Oct 5 '09 at 15:43

This is a duplicate question and has been asked many times on SO. The answer is, "it's a matter of style". Some prefer a style that indicates understanding of the fact that the compiler will initialize to null. Others prefer a style that makes it unnecessary to understand that the compiler will initialize to null.

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That was part of my question. –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:29
    
Does re-declaration of objects increase the size of my executable or affect performance if I do it many times. –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:39

1) Can I just declare Object 0 globally at the top and use it in each method instead of creating a new one each time (Is this what I am actually doing?)

Apart from the invalid name for an object (compare 0 and O), yes, you can. Redeclaring creates another variable with local scope, it does not modify the private member of the class.

2) Is it a good idea to initially set the object to null?

It’s unnecessary since this is done automatically when an object of your class is created.

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The invalid names come from me typing to fast. –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:27
    
Does redeclaration of objects add to the size of the executable? –  Xaisoft Oct 5 '09 at 15:31
    
Of course it does, a redaclaration creates a new (local) variable, wich of course needs to be saved. –  Maximilian Mayerl Oct 5 '09 at 15:58

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