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What I am trying to implement is basically a "on ng repeat finished rendering" handler. I am able to detect when it is done but I can't figure out how to trigger a function from it.

Check the fiddle:http://jsfiddle.net/paulocoelho/BsMqq/3/

JS

var module = angular.module('testApp', [])
    .directive('onFinishRender', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function (scope, element, attr) {
            if (scope.$last === true) {
                element.ready(function () {
                    console.log("calling:"+attr.onFinishRender);
                    // CALL TEST HERE!
                });
            }
        }
    }
});

function myC($scope) {
    $scope.ta = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
    function test() {
        console.log("test executed");
    }
}

HTML

<div ng-app="testApp" ng-controller="myC">
    <p ng-repeat="t in ta" on-finish-render="test()">{{t}}</p>
</div>

Answer: Working fiddle from finishingmove: http://jsfiddle.net/paulocoelho/BsMqq/4/

share|improve this question
    
Out of curiosity, what is the purpose of the element.ready() snippet? I mean.. is it some sort of jQuery plugin that you have, or should it be triggered when the element is ready? – gion_13 Jul 1 '14 at 14:47
1  
One could do it using built-in directives like ng-init – semiomant Jan 22 '15 at 11:49
    
Possible duplicate of ng-repeat finish event – Damjan Pavlica Nov 3 '15 at 13:58
    
duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/13471129/…, see my answer there – bresleveloper Dec 29 '15 at 6:54
up vote 306 down vote accepted
var module = angular.module('testApp', [])
    .directive('onFinishRender', function ($timeout) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function (scope, element, attr) {
            if (scope.$last === true) {
                $timeout(function () {
                    scope.$emit(attr.onFinishRender);
                });
            }
        }
    }
});

Notice that I didn't use .ready() but rather wrapped it in a $timeout. $timeout makes sure it's executed when the ng-repeated elements have REALLY finished rendering (because the $timeout will execute at the end of the current digest cycle -- and it will also call $apply internally, unlike setTimeout). So after the ng-repeat has finished, we use $emit to emit an event to outer scopes (sibling and parent scopes).

And then in your controller, you can catch it with $on:

$scope.$on('ngRepeatFinished', function(ngRepeatFinishedEvent) {
    //you also get the actual event object
    //do stuff, execute functions -- whatever...
});

With html that looks something like this:

<div ng-repeat="item in items" on-finish-render="ngRepeatFinished">
    <div>{{item.name}}}<div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
7  
+1, but I'd use $eval before using an event -- less coupling. See my answer for more details. – Mark Rajcok Mar 4 '13 at 19:21
1  
@PigalevPavel I think you're confusing $timeout (which is basically setTimeout + Angular's $scope.$apply()) with setInterval. $timeout will execute only once per the if condition, and that will be at the beginning of the next $digest cycle. For more info on JavaScript timeouts, see: ejohn.org/blog/how-javascript-timers-work – finishingmove Jul 11 '13 at 16:06
1  
@finishingmove Maybe I don't understand something :) But see I have ng-repeat in another ng-repeat. And I want to know for sure when all of them are finished. When I use your script with $timeout just for parent ng-repeat it all works fine. But if I don't use $timeout, I get a response before children ng-repeats are finished. I want to know why? And can I be sure that if I use your script with $timeout for parent ng-repeat I'll allways get a response when all ng-repeats are finished? – Pigalev Pavel Jul 11 '13 at 16:17
1  
Why you would use something like setTimeout() with 0 delay is another question though I must say I've never come across an actual specification for the browser's event queue anywhere, just what's implied by single-threadedness and the existence of setTimeout(). – rakslice Dec 4 '13 at 20:10
1  
Thanks for this answer. I have a question, why do we need to assign on-finish-render="ngRepeatFinished"? When I assign on-finish-render="helloworld", it works the same. – Super Chafouin Apr 24 '15 at 4:18

Use $evalAsync if you want your callback (i.e., test()) to be executed after the DOM is constructed, but before the browser renders. This will prevent flicker -- ref.

if (scope.$last) {
   scope.$evalAsync(attr.onFinishRender);
}

Fiddle.

If you really want to call your callback after rendering, use $timeout:

if (scope.$last) {
   $timeout(function() { 
      scope.$eval(attr.onFinishRender);
   });
}

I prefer $eval instead of an event. With an event, we need to know the name of the event and add code to our controller for that event. With $eval, there is less coupling between the controller and the directive.

share|improve this answer
    
What does the check for $last do? Can't find it in the docs. Was it removed? – Erik Aigner Jun 5 '13 at 10:18
2  
@ErikAigner, $last is defined on the scope if an ng-repeat is active on the element. – Mark Rajcok Jun 5 '13 at 14:14
    
Looks like your Fiddle is taking in an unnecessary $timeout. – bbodenmiller Apr 28 '14 at 8:16

The answers that have been given so far will only work the first time that the ng-repeat gets rendered, but if you have a dynamic ng-repeat, meaning that you are going to be adding/deleting/filtering items, and you need to be notified every time that the ng-repeat gets rendered, those solutions won't work for you.

So, if you need to be notified EVERY TIME that the ng-repeat gets re-rendered and not just the first time, I've found a way to do that, it's quite 'hacky', but it will work fine if you know what you are doing. Use this $filter in your ng-repeat before you use any other $filter:

.filter('ngRepeatFinish', function($timeout){
    return function(data){
        var me = this;
        var flagProperty = '__finishedRendering__';
        if(!data[flagProperty]){
            Object.defineProperty(
                data, 
                flagProperty, 
                {enumerable:false, configurable:true, writable: false, value:{}});
            $timeout(function(){
                    delete data[flagProperty];                        
                    me.$emit('ngRepeatFinished');
                },0,false);                
        }
        return data;
    };
})

This will $emit an event called ngRepeatFinished every time that the ng-repeat gets rendered.

How to use it:

<li ng-repeat="item in (items|ngRepeatFinish) | filter:{name:namedFiltered}" >

The ngRepeatFinish filter needs to be applied directly to an Array or an Object defined in your $scope, you can apply other filters after.

How NOT to use it:

<li ng-repeat="item in (items | filter:{name:namedFiltered}) | ngRepeatFinish" >

Do not apply other filters first and then apply the ngRepeatFinish filter.

When should I use this?

If you want to apply certain css styles into the DOM after the list has finished rendering, because you need to have into account the new dimensions of the DOM elements that have been re-rendered by the ng-repeat. (BTW: those kind of operations should be done inside a directive)

What NOT TO DO in the function that handles the ngRepeatFinished event:

  • Do not perform a $scope.$apply in that function or you will put Angular in an endless loop that Angular won't be able to detect.

  • Do not use it for making changes in the $scope properties, because those changes won't be reflected in your view until the next $digest loop, and since you can't perform an $scope.$apply they won't be of any use.

"But filters are not meant to be used like that!!"

No, they are not, this is a hack, if you don't like it don't use it. If you know a better way to accomplish the same thing please let me know it.

Summarizing

This is a hack, and using it in the wrong way is dangerous, use it only for applying styles after the ng-repeat has finished rendering and you shouldn't have any issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx 4 the tip. Anyway, a plunkr with a working example would be much appreciated. – holographix Nov 5 '14 at 9:06
2  
Unfortunately this doesn't worked for me, at least for latest AngularJS 1.3.7. So i discovered another workaround, not the nicest one, but if this is essential for you it will work. What i did is whenever i add/change/delete elements i always add another dummy element to the end of list, therefore since $last element is also changed, simple ngRepeatFinish directive by checking $last now will work. As soon as ngRepeatFinish is called i remove dummy item. (I also hide it with CSS so it dooesn't appear briefly) – darklow Dec 16 '14 at 19:29
1  
Works wonderfully, using angular 1.3.15, thanks – Likwid_T Apr 21 '15 at 16:43
1  
@Dzhu you are wrong: jsfiddle.net/W8nhv/102 – Josep Oct 15 '15 at 21:21
1  
@Josep you're right - when items are spliced/unshifted (i.e. the array being mutated), it doesn't work. My previous testing probably was with array that have been reassigned (using sugarjs) therefore it worked every time... Thanks for pointing this out – Dzhu Oct 16 '15 at 0:52

If you need to call different functions for different ng-repeats on the same controller you can try something like this:

The directive:

var module = angular.module('testApp', [])
    .directive('onFinishRender', function ($timeout) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function (scope, element, attr) {
            if (scope.$last === true) {
            $timeout(function () {
                scope.$emit(attr.broadcasteventname ? attr.broadcasteventname : 'ngRepeatFinished');
            });
            }
        }
    }
});

In your controller, catch events with $on:

$scope.$on('ngRepeatBroadcast1', function(ngRepeatFinishedEvent) {
// Do something
});

$scope.$on('ngRepeatBroadcast2', function(ngRepeatFinishedEvent) {
// Do something
});

In your template with multiple ng-repeat

<div ng-repeat="item in collection1" on-finish-render broadcasteventname="ngRepeatBroadcast1">
    <div>{{item.name}}}<div>
</div>

<div ng-repeat="item in collection2" on-finish-render broadcasteventname="ngRepeatBroadcast2">
    <div>{{item.name}}}<div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

The other solutions will work fine on initial page load, but calling $timeout from the controller is the only way to ensure that your function is called when the model changes. Here is a working fiddle that uses $timeout. For your example it would be:

.controller('myC', function ($scope, $timeout) {
$scope.$watch("ta", function (newValue, oldValue) {
    $timeout(function () {
       test();
    });
});

ngRepeat will only evaluate a directive when the row content is new, so if you remove items from your list, onFinishRender will not fire. For example, try entering filter values in these fiddles emit.

share|improve this answer
    
Similarly, test() is not always called in the evalAsynch solution when the model changes fiddle – John Harley Jan 31 '14 at 1:50
1  
what is ta in $scope.$watch("ta",... ? – Muhammad Adeel Zahid Dec 29 '14 at 19:50

A solution for this problem with a filtered ngRepeat could have been with Mutation events, but they are deprecated (without immediate replacement).

Then I thought of another easy one:

app.directive('filtered',function($timeout) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',link: function (scope,element,attr) {
            var elm = element[0]
                ,nodePrototype = Node.prototype
                ,timeout
                ,slice = Array.prototype.slice
            ;

            elm.insertBefore = alt.bind(null,nodePrototype.insertBefore);
            elm.removeChild = alt.bind(null,nodePrototype.removeChild);

            function alt(fn){
                fn.apply(elm,slice.call(arguments,1));
                timeout&&$timeout.cancel(timeout);
                timeout = $timeout(altDone);
            }

            function altDone(){
                timeout = null;
                console.log('Filtered! ...fire an event or something');
            }
        }
    };
});

This hooks into the Node.prototype methods of the parent element with a one-tick $timeout to watch for successive modifications.

It works mostly correct but I did get some cases where the altDone would be called twice.

Again... add this directive to the parent of the ngRepeat.

share|improve this answer
    
This works the best so far, but it's not perfect. For example I go from 70 items to 68, but it doesn't fire. – Gaui May 14 '15 at 17:17
1  
What could work is adding appendChild as well (since I only used insertBefore and removeChild) in the above code. – Sjeiti May 15 '15 at 7:49

Please have a look at the fiddle, http://jsfiddle.net/yNXS2/. Since the directive you created didn't created a new scope i continued in the way.

$scope.test = function(){... made that happen.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong fiddle? Same as the one in the question. – James M Mar 4 '13 at 18:15
    
humm, did you update the fiddle? Its currently showing a copy of my original code. – PCoelho Mar 4 '13 at 18:16

Very easy, this is how I did it.

.directive('blockOnRender', function ($blockUI) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            
            if (scope.$first) {
                $blockUI.blockElement($(element).parent());
            }
            if (scope.$last) {
                $blockUI.unblockElement($(element).parent());
            }
        }
    };
})

share|improve this answer
    
This code works of course if you have your own $blockUI service. – CPhelefu Jan 28 at 16:26

protected by Community Dec 28 '15 at 16:16

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