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I would like to find common slices in two Python lists.

For example:

list1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

list2 = [0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 8, 9, 0]

should return two lists: [3, 4, 5] and [8,9]

There could be any number or character in place of 0.

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7  
Whathaveyoutried.com –  Luis Tellez Mar 4 '13 at 17:52
    
Do you really want a list of lists returned? –  askewchan Mar 4 '13 at 17:54
    
No, it is not necessary, I edited my ask. Thank you. –  SomeoneMe Mar 4 '13 at 17:58
    
@Someone: the downvotes are the community's way of saying that readers generally prefer some evidence of prior effort, either in real attempts to solve the question, or least in the outlining of some potential strategies that could be used. –  halfer Mar 4 '13 at 18:02
    
@SomeoneMe - Actually, my downvote is because your post lacks a question. Stack Overflow is a question-and-answer site. It works best if posters (like you) provide a specific question. Then other readers (like me) provide potential answers to that question. This is different than other sites, which operate on a problem-solution or request-response or even topic-discussion paradigm. So, what is your question? –  Robᵩ Mar 4 '13 at 18:09
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> list1
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list2
[0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 8, 9, 0]
>>> [[e[0] for e in v]
     for k,v in groupby(((a ,b, a==b)
             for a,b in zip(list1, list2)), itemgetter(2))
      if k]
[[3, 4, 5], [8, 9]]

In case you wan;t to use difflib as suggested by @F.J., you should use in this way

>>> [list1[match.a: match.a + match.size]
     for match in SequenceMatcher(None,list1,list2).get_matching_blocks()[:-1]]

But remember this will be far inefficient than the previous linear solution

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Not a common slices (^_^)..........but nice answer :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 4 '13 at 18:00
    
@GrijeshChauhan: I am not sure if I understood your comment. This was what OP actually wanted :-) –  Abhijit Mar 4 '13 at 18:19
    
I said good answer.... first line is my face.. I was joking sorry :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 4 '13 at 18:22
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Use difflib.SequenceMatcher:

>>> import difflib
>>> list1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list2 = [0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 8, 9, 0]
>>> matcher = difflib.SequenceMatcher(a=list1, b=list2)
>>> match = matcher.find_longest_match(0, len(list1), 0, len(list2))
>>> match
Match(a=2, b=2, size=3)
>>> print list1[match.a:match.a+match.size]
[3, 4, 5]

SequenceMatcher.find_longest_match() takes starting and ending indices for each of its sequences (alo, ahi, blo, bhi), so after finding a match you can call find_longest_match() on the same matcher object but tweak the parameters so you start looking after the previous match.

You can do this in a loop, I would write a function to do this, something like the following:

import difflib
def common_slices(a, b):
    matcher = difflib.SequenceMatcher(a=a, b=b)
    sa, sb, size = matcher.find_longest_match(0, len(a), 0, len(b))
    while size != 0:
        if size > 1:
            yield a[sa:sa+size]
        sa, sb, size = matcher.find_longest_match(sa+size, len(a), sb+size, len(b))

>>> list(common_slices(list1, list2))
[[3, 4, 5], [8, 9]]
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+1 for difflib. Python never stops surprising me! –  BasicWolf Mar 4 '13 at 17:57
    
@F.J: Thank, you. I accepted the other answer just because it is easier for me (noob) to understand it ;-) –  SomeoneMe Mar 4 '13 at 18:13
    
I believe you would already be knowing, difflib.SequenceMatcher comes with lots of baggage which makes it unsuitable for simple problems esp because of its inefficiency. BTW, instead of looping with find_longest_match, you should actually use get_matching_blocks() –  Abhijit Mar 4 '13 at 18:16
    
Yeah I haven't actually used difflib much, but saw a sequence matching problem and it seemed applicable. However I imagine in most cases the performance difference would be negligible. –  Andrew Clark Mar 4 '13 at 18:21
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