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I have an object with a method that needs to mutate an outside instantiated object. I've been trying to reference the object in the parameter and that is clearly not working. This is what I have:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include "Character.h"

using namespace std;

class TesterClass {
public:
    void printStuff();
    TesterClass(Character& userChar);
private:
    Character& character;
};

TesterClass::TesterClass(Character& userChar)
{
    character = userChar;
}
int main() {
    Character userCharacter;
    TesterClass tester(userCharacter);
    return 0;
}

My question is how to can I use the instantiated tester class to edit the Character object via parameter passing. I'm very new at C++ and I've read every perceivable definition of reference and point passing, and it just doesn't seem to want to click.

share|improve this question
    
See initialization lists – pauld Mar 4 '13 at 18:16
1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/6576109/… – pauld Mar 4 '13 at 18:19

Your constructor should be:

TesterClass::TesterClass(Character& userChar):character(userChar){}

Also see this question.

To address the comment, here's example code where the value is modified:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

typedef char Character;

using namespace std;

class TesterClass {
public:
    void printStuff();
    TesterClass(Character& userChar);
private:
    Character& character;
};

TesterClass::TesterClass(Character& userChar):character(userChar)
{
}

void TesterClass::printStuff() {
  cout << character << endl;
  cout << ++character << endl;
}

int main() {
    Character userCharacter = 'a';
    TesterClass tester(userCharacter);
    tester.printStuff();
    cout << userCharacter << endl;
    ++userCharacter;
    cout << userCharacter << endl;
    tester.printStuff();
    return 0;
}

The output is

a
b
b
c
c
d
share|improve this answer
    
The original object, userCharacter, is not modified via the initialization list based on my testing. Any other implementations? – user2130768 Mar 4 '13 at 20:13

I agree with the previous answer/comments - You really should use an initialization list in your constructor. The thing is that your data-members are initialized through the initialization list (this happens BEFORE the body of the constructor is called). In your case, you have a Character& as a member. Since this is a reference, it HAS to be assigned something. I'm not sure which compiler you're using, but AFAIK that code shouldn't even compile.

What you're probably looking for is passing the reference in your main-method, like:

int main() 
{
    Character userCharacter;

    // Notice the use of the &-operator
    TesterClass tester(&userCharacter);
    return 0;
}

At this point, you're no longer talking about a Character-instance, but of the memory address of the instance. So, since you're passing the mem-address, it's actually a pointer you need in your class, not a reference. (For instance, userCharacter.SomeMethod() is synonymous to (&userCharacter)->SomeMethod() where & references and -> dereferences).

Instead, you could write your TesterClass as:

class TesterClass 
{
public:
    void printStuff();
    TesterClass(Character* userChar);
private:
    Character* character;
};

TesterClass::TesterClass(Character* userChar)
    : character(userChar) // <- Notice the init-list
{}

That way, in your TesterClass instance, you'll have a pointer that points to the same memory address where the userChar-instance resides.

As a sidenote: It can be good to notice though that userCharacter is a local variable, which means that it'll be destroyed when it runs out of scope. In this case it's not really a problem since tester is local as well. But if you're not used to working with pointers - Just a word of caution. Make sure you never pass the pointer (since you're storing the address in a class member) to a TesterClass-object that lives beyond the scope of the variable whose reference you're passing. That'll leave you with a dangling pointer.

I hope that helps you :)

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution works, but the comment that you can't mutate that Character instance using a reference is just wrong. – Dan Hook Mar 5 '13 at 14:00
    
Ah yes. Saw your solution, and of course you're right - You can mutate the instance. I edited my answer. Thanks for pointing it out. – Lavesson Mar 5 '13 at 14:30

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