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Are there any languages that use message passing syntax for regular functions?

I'm pretty familiar with Objective-C likes, where we can pass a message to object:

- (BOOL)dealWithThis:(id)this andThat:(id)that { ... }

...
[myObject dealWithThis:this andThat:[otherObject someValue]];

This invocation assumes we have an object (myObject). I know, there is dynamic dispatch and OOP and all, but my question is not about dispatch, but about syntax. I'm curious, whether there is a language, that allows something like:

+ (BOOL) deal with (id this) and (id that) { ... }
+ (id) some value of (id object) { ... }

...
[deal with (this) and [some value of (otherObject)]];

In this example, [] means function call and () interpolates expression from current scope. And in declaration, () denotes an argument. + means beginning of declaration, no parallels with class methods, etc.

I am asking this, because I want to build a toy parser for it, but maybe there is already a work, that may highlight some ideas or drawbacks on this subject. Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Okay, after 2 weeks, I did not found anything on this topic. It is time to invent that wheel. –  user2008074 Mar 21 '13 at 12:31
    
though i'm not sure whether you're after syntactic sugar or something more elaborate, have you looked into [this so post[(stackoverflow.com/questions/6145421/…) ? –  collapsar Mar 27 '13 at 18:05
    
Thanks for the link, but it still seems no language implements this kind of syntax. My goal is to make language more wordy, so you do not have to write code that needs to be commented. Primary issue with regular languages (c, pascal, and derivatives) is naming functions, and, especially, connect function name parts to argument positions. Smalltalk-syntaxed languages solved part of this by naming each argument, others invented namespaces to shorten names of single domain. I want to try a language, where you just say what function does, and not remeber what really strtok of CreateWindowEx takes. –  user2008074 Mar 29 '13 at 9:24
    
As simple as "[create button at position [proposed position for new button in window (thisWindow)]]". –  user2008074 Mar 29 '13 at 9:27

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