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I would like to have an observable array which will sort itself when an object is pushed into it (it would be even better if it would sort itself if any of the values it was using in the comparator function was changed).

Something where you could define the comparator function you want the array to sort on and then every time push was called it would add the pushed objects into the correct place in the array so the array remained sorted, like:

var sortedArray = ko.sortedObservableArray(
    function (a,b) { return b - a;},
    [1,7,4]
); // sortedArray will be [1,4,7]
sortedArray.push([5,2]); // sortedArray will now be [1,2,4,5,7]

Are there any libraries that will do this for me and if not what is the best way to go about implementing this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I ended up creating a sorted observable array by extending knockout observable array:

ko.sortedObservableArray = function (sortComparator, initialValues) {
    if (arguments.length < 2) {
        initialValues = [];
    }
    var result = ko.observableArray(initialValues);
    ko.utils.extend(result, ko.sortedObservableArray.fn);
    delete result.unshift;
    result.sort(sortComparator);
    return result;
};

ko.sortedObservableArray.fn = {
    push: function (values) {
        if (!$.isArray(values)) {
            values = [values];
        }
        var underlyingArray = this.peek();
        this.valueWillMutate();
        underlyingArray.push.apply(underlyingArray, values);
        underlyingArray.sort(this.sortComparator);
        this.valueHasMutated();
    },
    sort: function (sortComparator) {
        var underlyingArray = this.peek();
        this.valueWillMutate();
        this.sortComparator = sortComparator;
        underlyingArray.sort(this.sortComparator);
        this.valueHasMutated();
    },
    reinitialise: function (values) {
        if (!$.isArray(values)) {
            values = [values];
        }
        var underlyingArray = this.peek();
        this.valueWillMutate();
        underlyingArray.splice(0, underlyingArray.length);
        underlyingArray.push.apply(underlyingArray, values);
        underlyingArray.sort(this.sortComparator);
        this.valueHasMutated();
    },
    reverse: function () {
        var underlyingArrayClone = this.peek().slice();
        underlyingArrayClone.reverse();
        return underlyingArrayClone;
    }
};

Which can be used in the following way:

var sortedArray = ko.sortedObservableArray(
    function (a,b) { return a - b;},
    [1,7,4]
); // sortedArray will be [1,4,7]
sortedArray.push([5,2]); // sortedArray will now be [1,2,4,5,7]
sortedArray.sort(function (a,b){
    return b - a;
}); // sortedArray will now be [7,5,4,2,1]
sortedArray.push(6); // sortedArray will now be [7,6,5,4,2,1]

The only problem I have is that when reinitialising the sorted observable array with a new array in the same way you would reinitialise an observable array the sorted observable array isn't being sorted. To get around this I have added a reinitialise function on the sorted observable array:

var sortedArray = ko.sortedObservableArray(
    function (a,b) { return a - b;},
    [1,7,4]
); // sortedArray will be [1,4,7]

sortedArray([3,2,8]); // this doesn't work correctly, sortedArray will be [3,2,8]
// instead of [2,3,8]

// To get around this you can use reinitialise()
sortedArray.reinitialise([3,2,8]); // sortedArray will be [2,3,8]
share|improve this answer

Try this:

var sortedArray = ko.observableArray();
sortedArray.subscribe(function () {
    if (!sortedArray._isSorting) {
        sortedArray._isSorting = true;
        sortedArray.sort(function (a, b) { return b - a; });
        sortedArray._isSorting = false;
    }
});

You can wrap this up in a function to create new sorted observable arrays whenever you want.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't need extra flag. JavaScript is a language which has only one execution line, there are no threads. So, it means that nothing can change the of observableArray during sort operation –  Serjio Aug 21 '13 at 7:02
1  
@Serjio - Even single threaded code needs to be concerned with reentrancy. Calling sortedArray.sort will trigger another call to sortedArray.notifySubscribers() which will end up recursively calling our subscription callback again. –  Brandon Aug 22 '13 at 1:55
    
Yes, I understood. Thanks –  Serjio Aug 22 '13 at 9:17

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