Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find out how to speed up a certain part of my code. I've got three float variables: var1, var2, var3.

in sequential mode ...

       double start1, end1, t1;
       start1= (double)cvGetTickCount();


    var1= tester->predict(videocapture, params1, image);
    var2= tester->predict(videocapture, params2, image);
    var3= tester->predict(videocapture, params3, image);

    end1= (double)cvGetTickCount();
    t1= (end1-start1)/((double)cvGetTickFrequency()*1000.);
    printf( "Time1  = %g ms\n", t1 );

it seems to be slightly faster than parallel threads ...

double start2, end2, t2;
start2= (double)cvGetTickCount();
mp_set_dynamic(0);     // Explicitly enable/disable dynamic teams
omp_set_num_threads(3); // Use 3 threads for all consecutive parallel regions
#pragma omp parallel num_threads(3)
{
   #pragma omp sections //nowait
      {


         #pragma omp section 
      { 
            #pragma omp critical
     { 
              var1= tester->predict(videocapture, params1, image);
               }
       }    

         #pragma  omp section 
          {
            #pragma omp critical 
             {
              var2= tester->predict(videocapture, params2, image);       
               }

       }

         #pragma omp section 
          {
           #pragma omp critical 
           {
              var3= tester->predict(videocapture, params3, image);
               } 

       }
          }
        }
     } 

    end2= (double)cvGetTickCount();
    t2= (end2-start2)/((double)cvGetTickFrequency()*1000.);
    printf( "Time2  = %g ms\n", t2 );

Can someone please help me speed up the process of finding those three variables and tell me what I am doing wrong

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Look at the specification of the critical pragma here.

There are three crucial points here:

1) If you don't give the critical pragma a name, it's mapped to some unspecified name, and the same name is used for all unnamed critical sections.

2) Only one thread at a time can be in any critical section with a given name.

3) When a thread encounters a critical section, it waits there until no other threads are active in it before moving into it.

Thus your code tells all your threads to wait while they all take turns executing one item of your code at a time. This is equivalent to doing the operations serially, except that it requires the overhead of generating the threads in the first place (and whatever overhead occurs due to the waiting, which might be busy-waiting).

share|improve this answer
    
the problem is that if I remove the #pragma omp critical from my code then I need to use some static mutex m ( with m.lock(), m.unlock()) for the videocapture wich is the part that loads the frames from a video however, without any computation speed up. otherwise I get errors... so are you suggesting to just give a name after critical ? Thanks –  valentin Mar 4 '13 at 20:40
    
I'm not quite sure what exactly needs to be critical here, or what you're doing with the vars. In fact, it looks like there's no reason to have critical here at all; why do you think you need locks in the first place? –  Kyle Strand Mar 4 '13 at 21:21
    
Even without any locking whatsoever, since you're only making each predict call once, there's no reason for multiple threads to execute that call--ever. –  Kyle Strand Mar 4 '13 at 22:49
    
Actually the three predictions, var1, var2, var3 use 3 subwindows within a video frame. It would be nice to have 3 threads executing predictions at once for each frame, hence the parallel implementation need. var s are just the result of some simple classification task. –  valentin Mar 5 '13 at 12:36
    
I'm still not sure I understand what you're doing here or why it requires locking at all. Could you just try it without the critical pragma and tell me what, if any, problem occurs? –  Kyle Strand Mar 5 '13 at 19:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.