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I'm practicing SQL for an upcoming job interview and need some help. A friend suggested that I create a table and go as far as learning joins. I've been using SQL fiddle, oracle 11g R2.

My table looks as follows

--------------------------
| ID | Name | Manager_ID | 
--------------------------

Where the Manager_ID's that aren't 0 (these are managers) are employees that have a foreign key that relates to the primary key of certain managers.

I'm trying to find out how many employees report to a manager and display them as follows:

--------------------
| Name | Employees | 
--------------------

This is what I have so far, I'm just not sure how to list their names on the left field.

SELECT COUNT(b.manager_id) as "Manages"
FROM employees a, employees b
WHERE b.manager_id > 0 
AND a.id = b.manager_id
GROUP BY a.id  
/

Thanks for any help. Please keep it basic, I'm still a noob.

share|improve this question
1  
If you're using SQL Fiddle, it would be very helpful to link to the fiddle you've built so that we can see the data you're using without having to build the objects in our systems to be able to test our answers. It would also be helpful to specify exactly what you want the output to be. –  Justin Cave Mar 4 '13 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

There is a mental trick: Imagine your 3 column table (id, employee, manager_id) is a 6 column table (employee.id, employee.name, employee.manager_id, manager.id, manager.name, manager.manager_id) in which the three last columns have been compacted in a single id-column.

In your case, it is the same table, but most often it is not, so it quite easy to replace mentally a column-id (the foreign key) by the set of columns of the referred table (with id=primary key).

Usually also the foreign table is a list of countries, or product-line, that get repeated on several rows of the main table. Just the same as the same manager_id appears on more that one row.

There is no problem if some rows of the foreign table are not used (not all employees are managers), but you'll get a fatal error if the main table id tries to refers to a non existing id in the foreign table (a manager must manager at least one employee). To indicate that an employee has no manager, you put a non-existing employee.manager_id, You choose 0, more conventionally you use NULL.

  • To list the full table of all employee having a manager (everyone but the CEO) you would query:

    SELECT * FROM employee empl JOIN employee mngr ON empl.manager_id = mngr.id
    

    or (the same)

    SELECT * FROM employee empl, employee mngr WHERE empl.manager_id = mngr.id
    
  • To list the full table of all employees including those with no manager (everyone)

    SELECT * FROM employee empl LEFT JOIN employee mngr ON empl.manager_id = mngr.id
    

Your question is to get get the list of managers with the number of managed employees. So, supposing you have no employee with id=0 :

    SELECT manager.name, COUNT(*)
    FROM   employee empl, employee mngr
    WHERE  empl.manager_id = mngr.id
    GROUP BY mngr.id

To include all employees, even those managing 0 employees, is left (left join) as an exercise.

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+1: good first post, thanks for sharing. –  shellter Mar 5 '13 at 3:01

Your are pretty close here, you are already grouping by manager, you just need that manager's name in your select

SELECT  a.name, COUNT(b.manager_id) as "Employees"
FROM employees a, employees b
WHERE b.manager_id > 0 
AND a.id = b.manager_id
GROUP BY a.name, a.id 
share|improve this answer
    
SELECT a.name, COUNT(b.manager_id) as "Manages" FROM employees a, employees b WHERE b.manager_id > 0 AND a.id = b.manager_id GROUP BY a.name, a.id / –  user618313 Mar 4 '13 at 20:52
    
You need GROUP BY a.id, a.name not group by only id. –  ypercube Mar 4 '13 at 21:30
    
You are correct ypercube, edited answer accordingly. –  invertedSpear Mar 4 '13 at 22:58

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