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I was adapting a simple prime-number generation one-liner from Scala to C# (mentioned in a comment on this blog by its author). I came up with the following:

int NextPrime(int from)
{
  while(true)
  {
    n++;
    if (!Enumerable.Range(2, (int)Math.Sqrt(n) - 1).Any((i) => n % i == 0))
      return n;
  }
} 

It works, returning the same results I'd get from running the code referenced in the blog. In fact, it works fairly quickly. In LinqPad, it generated the 100,000th prime in about 1 second. Out of curiosity, I rewrote it without Enumerable.Range() and Any():

int NextPrimeB(int from)
{
  while(true)
  {
    n++;
    bool hasFactor = false;
    for (int i = 2; i <= (int)Math.Sqrt(n); i++)
    {
        if (n % i == 0) hasFactor = true;
    }
    if (!hasFactor) return n;
  }
}

Intuitively, I'd expect them to either run at the same speed, or even for the latter to run a little faster. In actuality, computing the same value (100,000th prime) with the second method, takes 12 seconds - It's a staggering difference.

So what's going on here? There must be fundamentally something extra happening in the second approach that's eating up CPU cycles, or some optimization going on the background of the Linq examples. Anybody know why?

share|improve this question
1  
You could speed it up by breaking from the inner for loop – BlackBear Mar 4 '13 at 20:56
1  
At first glance, I guess you would want to add a break inside the if block. That would increase performance a lot. – HighCore Mar 4 '13 at 20:56
    
That is what your linq query does, it will stop when it found its answer where your for loop finishes the entire iteration – bas Mar 4 '13 at 21:01
up vote 9 down vote accepted

For every iteration of the for loop, you are finding the square root of n. Cache it instead.

int root = (int)Math.Sqrt(n);
for (int i = 2; i <= root; i++)

And as other have mentioned, break the for loop as soon as you find a factor.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 For mentioning something that nobody else did. This is a significant part of the slowdown, in addition to not breaking on the first found factor. – KChaloux Mar 4 '13 at 21:01

The LINQ version short circuits, your loop does not. By this I mean that when you have determined that a particular integer is in fact a factor the LINQ code stops, returns it, and then moves on. Your code keeps looping until it's done.

If you change the for to include that short circuit, you should see similar performance:

int NextPrimeB(int from)
{
  while(true)
  {
    n++;
    for (int i = 2; i <= (int)Math.Sqrt(n); i++)
    {
        if (n % i == 0) return n;;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

It looks like this is the culprit:

for (int i = 2; i <= (int)Math.Sqrt(n); i++)
{
    if (n % i == 0) hasFactor = true;
}

You should exit the loop once you find a factor:

if (n % i == 0){
   hasFactor = true;
   break;
}

And as other have pointed out, move the Math.Sqrt call outside the loop to avoid calling it each cycle.

share|improve this answer
    
Woah, 4 answers and almost all the same. This is, in fact, the bigger part of the solution. It looks like BradM's suggestion to compute the sqrt outside of the loop also makes a significant difference. These two changes are resulting in a faster algorithm than Enumerable()/Any(). – KChaloux Mar 4 '13 at 21:00
1  
@KChaloux That's generally to be expected. LINQ makes it easier to write moderately effective code as long as you use the right operator at the right time, as it's more work than people often are willing to put in to implement the complex query operations. If you do implement them (correctly) on your own though you can omit the overhead of all of the iterator blocks, the delegate creations, etc. That overhead is often not a problem, but it can be, depending on the types of operations being done. – Servy Mar 4 '13 at 21:08

Enumerable.Any takes an early out if the condition is successful while your loop does not.

The enumeration of source is stopped as soon as the result can be determined.

This is an example of a bad benchmark. Try modifying your loop and see the difference:

    if (n % i == 0) { hasFactor = true; break; }
}

throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot satisfy criteria.");
share|improve this answer

In the name of optimization, you can be a little more clever about this by avoiding even numbers after 2:

if (n % 2 != 0)
{
  int quux = (int)Math.Sqrt(n);

  for (int i = 3; i <= quux; i += 2)
  {
    if (n % i == 0) return n;
  }
}

There are some other ways to optimize prime searches, but this is one of the easier to do and has a large payoff.

Edit: you may want to consider using (int)Math.Sqrt(n) + 1. FP functions + round-down could potentially cause you to miss a square of a large prime number.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually considered that afterwards. Not that this is being used in production code, mind you, but it was interesting to fool with. +1 for a good suggestion to anybody who might be using this for something more serious. – KChaloux Mar 4 '13 at 21:27
    
Once you start getting into serious optimizations you'll end up moving out of this algorithm entirely and into an algorithm designed to efficiently find prime numbers. This approach, in general, is fatally flawed and an only perform so well. – Servy Mar 4 '13 at 21:35
    
Yes, I concur. My comment was meant more to encourage thinking about what you are actually trying to do in the context of finding a prime, which is a gateway to considering other algorithms. – interplanetjanet Mar 4 '13 at 21:37

At least part of the problem is the number of times Math.Sqrt is executed. In the LINQ query this is executed once but in the loop example it's executed N times. Try pulling that out into a local and reprofiling the application. That will give you a more representative break down

int limit = (int)Math.Sqrt(n);
for (int i = 2; i <= limit; i++)
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