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I am new to perl and would like to do what I think is some basic string manipulation to DNA sequences stored in an rtf file.

Essentially, my file reads (file is in FASTA format):

>LM1
AAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGTATGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAA
AGTACTGTCCGTTAGAGAAGAACAAGGATAAGAGTAACTGCTTGTCCCTT
GACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGG
TAATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGATTTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGC
GCAGGCGGTCTTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTTAACCGGGGAG
GGTCATTGGAAACTGGAAGACTGGAGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCC
ACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAG
GCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCA
AACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGT

What I would like to do is read into my file and print the header (header is >LM1) then match the following DNA sequence GTGCCAGCAGCCGC and then print the preceding DNA sequence.
So my output would look like this:

>LM1 
AAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGTATGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAA
AGTACTGTCCGTTAGAGAAGAACAAGGATAAGAGTAACTGCTTGTCCCTT
GACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTAC

I have written the following program:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;

open(FASTA, "<seq_V3_V6_130227.rtf") or die "The file could not be found.\n";

while(<FASTA>) {
    chomp($_);
    if ($_ =~  m/^>/ ) {
        my $header = $_;
        print "$header\n";
    }

    my $dna = <FASTA>;
    if ($dna =~ /(.*?)GTGCCAGCAGCCGC/) {
        print "$dna";
    }

}
close(FASTA);

The problem is that my program reads the file line by line and the output I am receiving is the following:

>LM1
GACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTAC

Basically I don't know how to assign the entire DNA sequence to my $dna variable and ultimately don't know how to avoid reading the DNA sequence line by line. Also I am getting this warning: Use of uninitialized value $dna in pattern match (m//) at stacked.pl line 14, line 1113.

If anyone could give me some help with writing better code or point me in the correct direction it would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Don't you bioinformatics guys have libraries existing already to do this stuff? We get a lot of DNA+regex questions and I would think there would be existing tested libraries to deal with this already. –  Andy Lester Mar 5 '13 at 1:43
    
Try searching StackOverflow for "fasta perl". There are many questions that seem to be from people dealing with exactly your problems. stackoverflow.com/search?q=fasta+perl –  Andy Lester Mar 5 '13 at 1:44
    
@AndyLester It is true that libraries dealing with this stuff do exist but so much of bioinformatics needs to be tailored for your specific requirements which makes finding the optimal program difficult. Thanks for your suggestion, I will look under fasta perl. –  cebach561 Mar 5 '13 at 2:40
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using the pos function:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $dna = "";
my $seq = "GTGCCAGCAGCCGC";
while (<DATA>) {
  if (/^>/) {
    print;
  } else {
    if (/^[AGCT]/) {
      $dna .= $_;
    }
  }

}

if ($dna =~ /$seq/g) {
  print substr($dna, 0, pos($dna) - length($seq)), "\n";
}

__DATA__
>LM1

AAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGTATGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAA
AGTACTGTCCGTTAGAGAAGAACAAGGATAAGAGTAACTGCTTGTCCCTT
GACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGG
TAATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGATTTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGC
GCAGGCGGTCTTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTTAACCGGGGAG
GGTCATTGGAAACTGGAAGACTGGAGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCC
ACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAG
GCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCA
AACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGT

You can process a file with multiple entries like so:

while (<DATA>) {
  if (/^>/) {
    if ($dna =~ /$seq/g) {
      print substr($dna, 0, pos($dna) - length($seq)), "\n";
      $dna = ""; 
    }   
    print;
  } elsif (/^[AGCT]/) {
    $dna .= $_; 
  }   
}

if ($dna && $dna =~ /$seq/g) {
  print substr($dna, 0, pos($dna) - length($seq)), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, perreal. This works very well when I have one sequence such as >LM1 AAGT... Buy how could I change the program to handle multiple headers and sequences such as: >LM1 AAGT... >LM2 AGTC... >LM3 ACGG... and so on? –  cebach561 Mar 4 '13 at 22:10
    
updated the answer –  perreal Mar 4 '13 at 23:53
    
I don't see how it ever gets to the second `elsif'. Usually fasta file lines either begin with a '>', (an id), or a series of 'ATGC' characters. There should be no blank lines in a fasta file. –  Chris Charley Mar 5 '13 at 1:23
    
@ChrisCharley, thank you, fixed –  perreal Mar 5 '13 at 1:30
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Your while statement reads until the end of file. That means at every loop iteration, $_ is the next line in <FASTA>. So $dna = <FASTA> isn't doing what you think it is. It is reading more than you probably want it to.

while(<FASTA>) { #Reads a line here
  chomp($_);
  if ($_ =~  m/^>/ ) {
    my $header = $_;
    print "$header\n";
  }
  $dna = <FASTA> # reads another line here - Causes skips over every other line
}

Now, you need to read the sequence into your $dna. You can update your while loop with an else statement. So if its a head line, print it, else, we add it to $dna.

while(<FASTA>) {
  chomp($_);
  if ($_ =~  m/^>/ ) {
    # It is a header line, so print it
    my $header = $_;
    print "$header\n";
  } else {
    # if it is not a header line, add to your dna sequence.
    $dna .= $_;
  }
}

After the loop, you can do your regex.

Note: This solution assumes there is only 1 sequence in the fasta file. If you have more than one, your $dna variable will have all the sequences as one.

Edit: Adding simple a way to handle multiple sequences

my $dna = "";
while(<FASTA>) {
  chomp($_);
  if ($_ =~  m/^>/ ) {

    # Does $dna match the regex?
    if ($dna =~ /(.*?)GTGCCAGCAGCCGC/) {
      print "$1\n";
    }

    # Reset the sequence
    $dna = "";

    # It is a header line, so print it
    my $header = $_;
    print "$header\n";

  } else {
    # if it is not a header line, add to your dna sequence.
    $dna .= $_;
  }
}

# Check the last sequence
if ($dna =~ /(.*?)GTGCCAGCAGCCGC/) {
  print "$1\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nate, thank you for your response. What if I have more than one sequence in the fasta file? So it looks this: >LM1 ATGC... >LM2 ACGG... >LM3 ATTG... and so on. –  cebach561 Mar 4 '13 at 21:54
    
@user2133248 - I added a simple way to do so. The idea is the check if the $dna sequence matches the regex every time you see a >. Then you do it one more time after the loop to check the last sequence. –  Nate Mar 5 '13 at 1:44
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I came up with a solution using BioSeqIO (and the trunc method from BioSeq from the BioPerl distribution. I also used index to find the subsequence rather than using a regular expression.

This solution does not print out the id, (line begins with >), if the subsequence was not found or if the subsequence begins at the first postion, (and thus no preceding characters).

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Bio::SeqIO;

my $in  = Bio::SeqIO->new( -file   => "fasta_junk.fasta" ,
                           -format => 'fasta');

my $out = Bio::SeqIO->new( -file   => '>test.dat',
                           -format => 'fasta');

my $lookup = 'GTGCCAGCAGCCGC';

while ( my $seq = $in->next_seq() ) {
    my $pos = index $seq->seq, $lookup;

    # if $pos != -1, ($lookup not found),
    # or $pos != 0, (found $lookup at first position, thus
    #   no preceding characters).
    if ($pos > 0) {
        my $trunc = $seq->trunc(1,$pos);
        $out->write_seq($trunc);
    }
}

__END__
*** fasta_junk.fasta
>LM1
AAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGTATGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAA
AGTACTGTCCGTTAGAGAAGAACAAGGATAAGAGTAACTGCTTGTCCCTT
GACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAGCCACGGCTAACTACGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGG
TAATACGTAGGTGGCAAGCGTTGTCCGGATTTATTGGGCGTAAAGCGCGC
GCAGGCGGTCTTTTAAGTCTGATGTGAAAGCCCCCGGCTTAACCGGGGAG
GGTCATTGGAAACTGGAAGACTGGAGTGCAGAAGAGGAGAGTGGAATTCC
ACGTGTAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGATATGTGGAGGAACACCAGTGGCGAAG
GCGACTCTCTGGTCTGTAACTGACGCTGAGGCGCGAAAGCGTGGGGAGCA
AACAGGATTAGATACCCTGGTAGTCCACGCCGT

*** contents of test.dat
>LM1
AAGTCTGACGGAGCAACGCCGCGTGTATGAAGAAGGTTTTCGGATCGTAAAGTACTGTCC
GTTAGAGAAGAACAAGGATAAGAGTAACTGCTTGTCCCTTGACGGTATCTAACCAGAAAG
CCACGGCTAACTAC
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Chris thanks for you help. I don't have BioPerl installed on my computer but once I do I will check out this program. –  cebach561 Mar 5 '13 at 2:46
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read the whole file into memory then look for the regexp

while(<FASTA>) {
    chomp($_);
    if ($_ =~  m/^>/ ) {
        my $header = $_;
        print "$header\n";
    } else {
    $dna .= $_;
    }
}
if ($dna =~ /(.*?)GTGCCAGCAGCCGC/) {
    print $1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've edited the answer because a closing curly brace was missing. Regardless, you must print the grouped match of the regex, $1, not $dna. And the string lost format without original \n characters. I don't know it that matters to solve the problem, but could be an issue for the OP. –  Birei Mar 4 '13 at 21:33
    
thanks birei, I've tweaked it to not print $dna –  Vorsprung Mar 5 '13 at 8:55
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