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I have a data frame that is made up of mostly sequential rows. Mostly meaning that some are out of sequence or missing. When the the sequential row for the current row is present, I'd like to perform some function using data from both rows. If it's not present, skip it and move on. I know I can do this with a loop, but it's quite slow. I think this has something to do with using the index. Here is an example of my problem using sample data and a desired result that uses a loop.

df <- data.frame(id=1:10, x=rnorm(10))
df <- df[c(1:3, 5:10), ]
df$z <- NA


dfLoop <- function(d)
{
  for(i in 1:(nrow(d)-1))
  {
    if(d[i+1, ]$id - d[i, ]$id == 1)
    {
      d[i, ]$z = d[i+1, ]$x - d[i, ]$x
    }
  }

  return(d)
}

dfLoop(df)

So how might I be able to get the same result without using a loop? Thanks for any help.

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1  
I your description, you said some data was "out of sequence", does that mean you have some unordered data? e.g.: 1, 3, 2 –  N8TRO Mar 4 '13 at 22:43
    
No, the data is ordered, but some of the sequence may be missing. –  robbie Mar 6 '13 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Give this a try:

index <- which(diff(df$id)==1) #gives the index of rows that have a row below in sequence

df$z[index] <- diff(df$x)[index]

As a function:

fun <- function(x) {
  index <- which(diff(x$id)==1)
  xdiff <- diff(x$x)
  x$z[index] <- xdiff[index]
  return(x)
}

Compare with your loop:

a <- fun(df)
b <- dfLoop(df)
identical(a, b)
[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry typo. Corrected now. Had pasted from its use in the function, where I included it to show more explicitly what is happening. –  alexwhan Mar 4 '13 at 23:04
    
Great! Thanks for the help. I'll try it on my real data set and see how it works. –  robbie Mar 6 '13 at 15:19

R is vector-based. Try this code -- it is just like your for loop but using the entire range at once:

i <- 1:(nrow(d)-1)
d[i+1, ]$id - d[i, ]$id == 1

You should see a vector of length nrow(d) - 1, containing the indexes where the condition holds. Save it:

cond <- (d[i+1, ]$id - d[i, ]$id == 1)

You can also get the positions of all TRUE values:

(cond.pos <- which(cond))

Now you can assign values to those indexes where the condition is true:

d[cond.pos, ]$z <- d[cond.pos+1, ]$x - d[cond.pos, ]$x

There are quite a few ways to achieve what you want, but it takes some experience to grab the "vector-based" idea. Especially the diff function, as noted by alexwhan, can help save some typing for this specific example.

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Thanks so much. This is very helpful. I was aware that I could create these filtering vectors, but I had no idea I could reference rows like with the i+1 without a loop. –  robbie Mar 6 '13 at 18:06
    
I'd love to but apparently I don't have enough reputation to=/ –  robbie Mar 7 '13 at 21:22

Not the prettiest but it will run without a loop:

> df <- data.frame(id=1:10, x=rnorm(10))
> df <- df[c(1:3, 5:10), ]
> df$z <- NA
> df
   id           x  z
1   1 -1.91564886 NA
2   2  0.27260879 NA
3   3 -1.08563119 NA
5   5 -0.13747215 NA
6   6 -0.38367874 NA
7   7 -1.17825737 NA
8   8 -0.08521386 NA
9   9 -0.44392382 NA
10 10 -0.97192253 NA
> 
> temp = c(df$id,1:10)
> temp
 [1]  1  2  3  5  6  7  8  9 10  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> 
> idx = which(table(temp)<2)
> idx 
4 
4 
> 
> newdf = df[-idx,]
> newdf
   id           x  z
1   1 -1.91564886 NA
2   2  0.27260879 NA
3   3 -1.08563119 NA
6   6 -0.38367874 NA
7   7 -1.17825737 NA
8   8 -0.08521386 NA
9   9 -0.44392382 NA
10 10 -0.97192253 NA
> 
> newdf$z = newdf$x[2:nrow(df)] - newdf$x[1:(nrow(df)-1)]
> newdf
   id           x          z
1   1 -1.91564886  2.1882577
2   2  0.27260879 -1.3582400
3   3 -1.08563119  0.7019524
6   6 -0.38367874 -0.7945786
7   7 -1.17825737  1.0930435
8   8 -0.08521386 -0.3587100
9   9 -0.44392382 -0.5279987
10 10 -0.97192253         NA
> 
> newdf = rbind(newdf,df[idx,])
> newdf
   id           x          z
1   1 -1.91564886  2.1882577
2   2  0.27260879 -1.3582400
3   3 -1.08563119  0.7019524
6   6 -0.38367874 -0.7945786
7   7 -1.17825737  1.0930435
8   8 -0.08521386 -0.3587100
9   9 -0.44392382 -0.5279987
10 10 -0.97192253         NA
5   5 -0.13747215         NA
> 
> newdf = newdf[order(newdf$id),]
> newdf
   id           x          z
1   1 -1.91564886  2.1882577
2   2  0.27260879 -1.3582400
3   3 -1.08563119  0.7019524
5   5 -0.13747215         NA
6   6 -0.38367874 -0.7945786
7   7 -1.17825737  1.0930435
8   8 -0.08521386 -0.3587100
9   9 -0.44392382 -0.5279987
10 10 -0.97192253         NA
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This first calculates all the "first differences" and then sets the non-sequential rows to NA:

 df[1:(nrow(df)-1), "z"] <- df[-1, "x"] - df[-nrow(df), "x"]
 is.na(df[-nrow(df), "z"]) <- diff( df$id) !=1
 df
#
   id           x           z
1   1 -0.04493361  0.02874335
2   2 -0.01619026  0.96002647
3   3  0.94383621          NA
5   5  0.59390132  0.32507605
6   6  0.91897737 -0.13684107
7   7  0.78213630 -0.70757132
8   8  0.07456498 -2.06391668
9   9 -1.98935170  2.60917744
10 10  0.61982575          NA

Negative indexing is useful in creating slightly shorter version of vectors. The is.na<- function takes a logical argument on its RHS and uses it to set as NA all of the entries in its LHS side target in accord with the "verdict" of the logical vector.

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