Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to serialize the following class:

public class Library extends ArrayList<Book> implements Serializable{

public Library(){
    check();
}

using the following method of that class:

void save() throws IOException {
    String path = System.getProperty("user.home");
    File f = new File(path + "\\Documents\\CardCat\\library.ser");    

    ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream (new FileOutputStream (f));  
    oos.writeObject(this);
    oos.close();
}

However, rather than creating a file called library.ser, the program is creating a directory named library.ser with nothing in it. Why is this?

If its helpful, the save() method is initially called from this method (of the same class):

void checkFile() {
    String path = System.getProperty("user.home");
    File f = new File(path + "\\Documents\\CardCat\\library.ser");    

    try {    
         if (f.exists()){
             load(f);
         }
         else if (!f.exists()){
             f.mkdirs();
             save();
         }
    } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException ex) {
         Logger.getLogger(Library.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

f.mkdirs();

It is this line that creates the directory. It should be

f.getParentFile().mkdirs();
share|improve this answer
1  
And also f.createNewFile(), to create the file that doesn't exist. –  Pescis Mar 4 '13 at 23:10
1  
@Pescis That's completely unnecessary. new FileOutputStream() will do that anyway. –  EJP Mar 4 '13 at 23:48
    
You're right, the FileNotFoundException thrown confused me. –  Pescis Mar 4 '13 at 23:52

I'm pretty sure that the call to f.mkdirs() is your problem. If the file doesn't already exist (which seems to be your case), the f.mkdirs() call will give you a directory called "library.ser" instead of a File, which is why your "save()" call isn't working - you can't serialize an object to a directory.

share|improve this answer
    
In other words, there is no such constraint. I don't really understand what this sentence has to do with it, or indeed what it really means. –  EJP Mar 4 at 2:53
    
It means that the OS is allowing him to create a directory called "library.ser". When he calls "save()", he's ultimately trying to serialize to a directory, which is not possible. –  Ben Lawry Mar 4 at 17:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.