Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a function to clone the Histogram functionality of the Data Analysis Add-In in Excell. Basically, an input of sample data is provided, and then the bin ranges as well. The bin ranges must be monotonically increasing, and in my case, need to be specifically [0 20 40 60 80 100]. Excell calculates if a sample falls into the bin range if it is greater than the lower bound (left edge) and less than or equal to the upper bound (right edge).

I have written bin sorting algorithm below, and it gives improper output for data0 (very close), but proper output for data1 and data2. Proper in this case means that the output from this algorithm matches exactly the output in the table Excell generates where the number of samples is tallied next to the bin. Any help is appreciated!

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char **agv)
{
    const int SAMPLE_COUNT      = 21;
    const int BIN_COUNT         = 6;
    int binranges[BIN_COUNT]    = {0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100};
    int bins[BIN_COUNT]         = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

    int data0[SAMPLE_COUNT] =  {4,82,49,17,89,73,93,86,74,36,74,55,81,61,88,94,72,65,35,25,79};
    // for data0 excell's bins read:
    // 0    0
    // 20   2
    // 40   3
    // 60   2
    // 80   7
    // 100  7
    //
    // instead output of bins is: 203277

    int data1[SAMPLE_COUNT] = {88,83,0,0,95,86,0,94,92,77,94,73,93,90,50,95,93,83,0,95,91};
    //for data1 excell and this algorithm both yield:
    // 0    4
    // 20   0
    // 40   0
    // 60   1
    // 80   2
    // 100  14  (correct)

    int data2[SAMPLE_COUNT] = {58,48,75,68,85,78,74,83,83,75,67,58,75,58,84,68,57,88,55,79,72};
    //for data2 excell and this algorithm both yield:
    // 0    0
    // 20   0
    // 40   0
    // 60   6
    // 80   10
    // 100  5   (correct)

    for (unsigned int binNum = 1; binNum < BIN_COUNT; ++binNum)
    {
        const int leftEdge = binranges[binNum - 1];
        const int rightEdge = binranges[binNum];

        for (unsigned int sampleNum = 0; sampleNum < SAMPLE_COUNT; ++sampleNum)
        {
            const int sample = data0[sampleNum];

            if (binNum == 1)
            {
                if (sample >= leftEdge && sample <= rightEdge)
                    bins[binNum - 1]++;
            }
            else if (sample > leftEdge && sample <= rightEdge)
            {
                bins[binNum]++;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < BIN_COUNT; ++i)
        std::cout << bins[i] << " " << std::flush;

    std::cout << std::endl << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
something escaped me before giving my answer: what happens in excell if you give 0 (or even a negative value) as one of your input values? It should not fit any bin from your definition. – didierc Mar 5 '13 at 0:05
    
nevermind, I think your comment gave me my answer, see my update. – didierc Mar 5 '13 at 0:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming the edges are always in increasing order, all you need is:

     unsigned int bin;
    for (unsigned int sampleNum = 0; sampleNum < SAMPLE_COUNT; ++sampleNum)
    {
           const int sample = data0[sampleNum];
           bin = BIN_COUNT;
           for (unsigned int binNum = 0; binNum < BIN_COUNT; ++binNum)  {
                 const int rightEdge = binranges[binNum];
                 if (sample <= rightEdge) {
                    bin = binNum;
                    break;
                }
           }
           bins[bin]++;
      }

Although, for this code to work, you will need to add one more bin for the values which are equal or below the first edge (0).

The rational is that if you have n separators, then you have n+1 intervals.

share|improve this answer
    
The output this produced is [2, 3, 2, 7, 7, 0] however excell gives [0 2 3 2 7 7]. This difference can be huge when graphing later. I got the same result too with my original attempt, but Excell does it differently – rem45acp Mar 4 '13 at 23:45
    
If another sample data set is provided, say {87,92,86,57,96,60,0,96,93,55,68,77,85,77,77,93,69,74,32,86,43}, Excel produces [1 0 1 4 6 9] while this produces [1 1 4 6 9 0]? – rem45acp Mar 4 '13 at 23:49
1  
This is O(n^2) with the inner loop to find the right bin. But given the bin width is constant, you can just take bin=val % BIN_WIDTH and clamp it to (0, BIN_COUNT-1) and it would be O(n). – gavinb Mar 5 '13 at 0:26
1  
note that it's not O(n*n), because I don't loop on a loop on the input value. It is more accurately O(n*m), m being the number of bins, and since it's a constant, it boils down to O(n). But you are correct that your solution is probably faster, since the bin computation is done arithmetically. – didierc Mar 5 '13 at 0:44
1  
@didierc Yes indeed, I realised shortly after posting that it wasn't really O(n^2) and came back to correct it. – gavinb Mar 5 '13 at 0:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.