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I managed to shoot myself in the foot this morning by doing the following:

  1. Started working on a change to my project
  2. Made a bunch of edits to a bunch of files
  3. Realized that my approach was all wrong, and that I needed to start over
  4. cd'd to the top level of my project and did a "svn --recursive revert ." to restore my local sandbox to its pre-changes state.
  5. Howled in horror as I realized that there had been a number of other changes outstanding in my local sandbox, and I had just obliterated all of them. (the svn server had been down last Friday so I hadn't been able to check them in, and I had forgot about them over the weekend)

Fortunately in this case I had done an "svn diff > temp.txt" before leaving work on Friday, and the temp.txt file was still on my hard drive, so I was able to feed that file into "patch" and recover my lost changes.

But for my future reference (i.e. the next time I make the same dumb mistake)... is there any way to tell svn to undo an "svn revert"? Does svn keep a backup of the local/not-checked-in diffs anywhere?

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20  
IIRC TortoiseSVN moves the reverted files to the recycle bin, but the original SVN command-line client does not have such nuances. –  Dario Solera Nov 10 '09 at 11:46
1  
I can't find the file in the recycle bin. Am I out of luck? –  Buzzer Apr 4 '12 at 13:30
3  
Top comment regarding the recycle bin. That's just saved my day! –  OrganicPanda Jun 19 '12 at 13:59
1  
mine too! thank you so much. The reverted file just appeared in my recycle bin and could be restored. –  sladda May 10 '13 at 8:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted

No, absolutely NO.

If you say to Subversion it should revert a file, all changes are gone by the wind.

Only your memory can get them back.

Exception: New files you had added, will only lose their status "added", but the file will remain in this directory, only status is unknown("?")

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5  
Addendum to the above: Version control only helps you if you actually commit the files. If you are in a position that killing your working copy will kill hours of work, then you aren't committing frequently enough. –  msemack Oct 5 '09 at 19:12
1  
Agreed... in this case the svn server was down, and that's why I had un-committed changes still pending. :^( –  Jeremy Friesner Oct 5 '09 at 20:19
    
If this happened, you can just file-copy your whole working copy to continue on a different task. In this way your task can still be committed into single commits –  Peter Parker Oct 5 '09 at 21:00
3  
Yes!!! There is a way to recover depending on your O/S and/or IDE -- read the other answers below before you have a heart attack!! –  HDave May 8 '13 at 3:21
    
If for some reason you cannot commit frequently, consider making patches instead. –  ricksmt Jun 9 at 21:17

There is a solution... go to your recycle bin you'll find there the latest version of the deleted file. Tortoise "throwing" to the recycle bin every file that it revert.

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2  
Incidentally, this is also why TortoiseSVN seems so slow when doing reverts. Moving a file to the recycle bin is a very slow operation when the recycle bin is full. You can disable this feature in the "General - dialogs 1" TortoiseSVN settings. –  Wim Coenen Dec 23 '09 at 17:35
6  
Thanks man, you saved me! I accidentally did Revert and almost lost 2 weeks of work. Fortunately, I found it in the recycle bin. –  Arie Livshin Aug 15 '10 at 15:00
    
Saved my butt too :-) –  Gordon Carpenter-Thompson Sep 10 '12 at 16:00
1  
For this answer I'd upvote you 1000 times if I could –  Joel Apr 1 '13 at 13:10
    
@ArieLivshin, why would you work for 2 weeks without committing? It seems you need to learn more about branches. –  JoelFan May 8 '13 at 21:08

Not really Subversion specific, but if you're working with Eclipse, you can try your luck in the local history.

Now, something a little bit more Subversion specific: if you don't want to make a branch for every change you do, you can keep a couple of trunk checked out locally (trunk-modif-1, trunk-modif-2...). Each "modification" is done on a separate tree and you only need to keep a list of which check out correspond to which modification.

Or you could use Git locally but I never tried it.

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3  
You sir, are the man. –  sgriffinusa Jan 30 '12 at 20:33
    
FYI - get to the local history via the right click context menu "Restore from local history". –  HDave May 8 '13 at 3:23

Recently did this mistake of not committing new file changes (about 10) onto SVN and they all vanished because of my silly mistake. But what saved me was the windows "Restore previous versions" option in the context menu. Phew that was a relief and lesson learnt.

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Thank you! This saved me from redoing hours of work! I've never seen this feature of windows before, but it saved my bacon! –  SLC Jan 23 '12 at 16:51
    
Where can I send the $6000 I owe you for this having thus saved days of work? Lesson learned... –  HDave May 8 '13 at 3:07

Also if you have reverted your .NET code (.cs files etc) and you've built your application before revert but after you've made changes, you could recover changes from assembly file using any of the reflector tools to view code.

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If you are using InteliJ then you are a lucky person. On the top menu, you have a Version Control option, and under it you will find local history option, where you will find all the history for selected file, including all the operation you did with that file (update,commit, revert ).

Good luck, Arkde

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1  
And if it was a new file, the file itself will get deleted. In that case select the folder the file was in from Project view and then select 'Local History'. IntelliJ saved the day again. –  Nufail Aug 5 '13 at 11:41

protected by bmargulies Jul 8 '11 at 18:28

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