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I have the following class:

public sealed class TaskType
{
    private readonly String name;
    private readonly int value;

    public static readonly TaskType BUG = new TaskType(1, "Bug");
    public static readonly TaskType ISSUE = new TaskType(2, "Issue");
    public static readonly TaskType FEATURE = new TaskType(3, "Feature");
    //more here

    private TaskType(int value, String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return name;
    }
}

How can I cast TaskType from say a value:

int i = 1;
String name = (TaskType)i.ToString(); // this is where i am stuck!

I know I have to use Reflection to iterate through the properties, but this not working for me.

i have tried to use this function for example, but this doesn't work:

private TaskType getTaskType(int id)
{
    PropertyInfo[] properties = typeof(TaskType).GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);

    foreach (PropertyInfo property in properties)
    {
        TaskType t = (TaskType)property.GetValue(null, null);
        if (t.ToValue() == id)
            return t;
    }

    return null;
}
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i is of type integer and cant be casted to type TaskType –  Sleiman Jneidi Mar 4 '13 at 23:48
    
Your goal might be simpler if TaskType had a static collection (an array or dictionary) of the various static readonly instances. But I get the feeling you may be venturing into "code smell" territory. –  hatchet Mar 4 '13 at 23:54
    
This is very confusing. I guess that what you need is Operator Overload??.. Also, this could be solved with an Enum, you know... –  HighCore Mar 4 '13 at 23:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you really stuck with that class definition and cannot use something like enum, then here is working code, which gets name via reflection:

int id = 1;
Type type = typeof(TaskType);
BindingFlags privateInstance = BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance;
var name = type
    .GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static)
    .Select(p => p.GetValue(null))
    .Cast<TaskType>()
    .Where(t => (int)type.GetField("value", privateInstance).GetValue(t) == id)
    .Select(t => (string)type.GetField("name", privateInstance).GetValue(t))
    .FirstOrDefault();

// Output: Bug
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1  
Thank you so much. Going to be little biased, and set this as answer, as it helped me with another question i was going to ask (getting list as dropdowns) - which is now much easier to work out with the above solution (for me atleast). –  praveensewak Mar 6 '13 at 5:07

Why don't you just use an Enum type?

public enum Task {
  Bug,
  Issue,
  Feature
}

Then you can cast it from an int.

int i = 1;
Task myTask = (Task)i;

You can also get it from the string name.

string s = "Bug";
Task bugType = Enum.Parse(typeof(Task), s);
share|improve this answer
    
... <irony> because this doesn't involve the slowness of reflection and a ton of public static readonly whatever instances consuming memory for no reason. </irony> –  HighCore Mar 4 '13 at 23:58
    
Sorry, I moved to this type coz i needed extra functionality that enum was not providing. The actual TaskType class is more complex, and has other properties. Plus, I had to work with existing code, which wasn't playing nice with enums. –  praveensewak Mar 6 '13 at 4:43

The problem is that you are trying to get properties but your TaskType objects are fields:

public static TaskType GetTaskType(int id)
{
    FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(TaskType).GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);

    foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
    {
        TaskType t = (TaskType)field.GetValue(null);
        if (t.value == id)
        {
            return t;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

Using LINQ this can be a single line of code:

public static TaskType GetTaskType(int id)
{
    return typeof(TaskType)
        .GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static)
        .Select(f => (f.GetValue(null) as TaskType))
        .FirstOrDefault(t => t != null && t.value == id);
}

public static TaskType GetTaskType(string name)
{
    return typeof(TaskType)
        .GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static)
        .Select(f => (f.GetValue(null) as TaskType))
        .FirstOrDefault(
            t => t != null &&
            t.name.Equals(name, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase));
}

However, as others already mentioned an enum might be much easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much pescolino! –  praveensewak Mar 6 '13 at 5:09

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