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I have a question about VC++ if u compile this code in VC++ :

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
//#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>

TCHAR lpBuffer[MAX_PATH];

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    DWORD dwBufferLength = 0;
    if(!(dwBufferLength = GetWindowsDirectory(lpBuffer, MAX_PATH)))
        std::cout << "Last error : "<< GetLastError() << std::endl;
    else{
        std::cout << lpBuffer << std::endl;
        /*for(DWORD i = 0; i < dwBufferLength; i++)
            printf("%c", lpBuffer);*/
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }

    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

i see only "C" and if i compile it by g++ i will see "C:\Windows" what's the problem? sure i should delete the first line "#include "stdafx"" under g++ :)

and change "_tmain" to "main" ^__^

share|improve this question
    
Does G++ recognize the _tmain function as the starting function? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 5 '13 at 0:34
    
nope, i should write main :) thank u i will change it in my question :) –  La VloZ Mar 5 '13 at 0:36
1  
You are sending a wide string, a Unicode string, to cout. You should use wcout instead. G++ isn't very wide. You can turn the clock back to the 1980s with Project + Properties, General, Character set = Multi-Byte. –  Hans Passant Mar 5 '13 at 1:06
    
@HansPassant: Yeaaaaaaaah!!!! thank u it works :) mmmmmmm but if u put it as answer for i choose it as the best answer ;) –  La VloZ Mar 5 '13 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

After correcting the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>

int main() {
    char lpBuffer[MAX_PATH];
    DWORD dwBufferLength = 0;

    if(!(dwBufferLength = GetWindowsDirectory(lpBuffer, MAX_PATH)))
        std::cout << "Last error : "<< GetLastError() << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << lpBuffer << "\n";
    return 0;
}

I get identical results ("C:\windows") with both VC++ (2012) and gcc 4.7.2 (MinGW).

share|improve this answer
    
You should add #include "stdafx" for it works on VC++, i don't see "C", i see "00ABF608" !!!!!!!! –  La VloZ Mar 5 '13 at 0:46
    
i have VC++ 2010 Express !!!!! ;) –  La VloZ Mar 5 '13 at 0:53
    
@LaVloZ No, you don't need to include stdafx.h to compile under VC; you can go to project properties and turn off the precompiled headers option under compiler settings. Jerry, maybe you should call GetWindowsDirectoryA explicitly since you're not using any of the TCHAR stuff. That'll make the code work correctly even if the OP has _UNICODE defined. –  Praetorian Mar 5 '13 at 1:11
    
aahhhh thank u, i wasn't know that :) ^__^ i always was fithing with stdafx.h because most of time i needn't it :) –  La VloZ Mar 5 '13 at 15:25

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