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I have the following query

SELECT txt1 FROM T1 WHERE txt1 LIKE '_a\%'

will that result in answers that have any char+a+\+whatever?

is something like Pa\pe valid as a result?

are Ca% or _a% valid answers maybe?

how does \ behave normally inside an SQL query??

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Most often, it is an escape character, saying interpret the next character as a literal, not a wild card character... –  Sparky Mar 5 '13 at 1:58
    
so it should produce results like Ca% or _a%? –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 2:16
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

% is a wildcard character that matches zero or more characters in a LIKE clause. _ is a wildcard character that maches exactly one character in a LIKE clause.

\ is a special character known as an escape character that indicates that the character directly following it should be interpreted literally (useful for single quotes, wildcard characters, etc.).

For example:

SELECT txt1 FROM T1 WHERE txt1 LIKE '_a%'

will select records with txt1 values of 'xa1', 'xa taco', 'ya anything really', etc.

Now let's say you want to actually search for the percent sign. In order to do this you need a special character that indicates % should not be treated as a wildcard. For example:

SELECT txt1 FROM T1 WHERE txt1 LIKE '_a\%'

will select records with txt1 values of 'ba%' (but nothing else).

Finally, a LIKE clause would typically contain a wildcard (otherwise you could just use = instead of LIKE). So you might see a query containing \%%. Here the first percent sign would be treated as a literal percent sign, but the second would be interpreted as a wildcard. For example:

SELECT txt1 FROM T1 WHERE txt1 LIKE '_a\%%'

will select records with txt1 values of 'da%something else', 'fa% taco', 'ma% bunch of tacos', etc.

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ok, but _ will still select any char right? so then LIKE '_a\%' actually results in stuff like 'Xa\%' being X any char (anything actually)? –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 3:38
    
Yes. _ is a wildcard character that matches any single character. % will match multiple characters. –  chrislopresto Mar 5 '13 at 3:58
    
are both 'Ca%' and '_a%' valid query results for SELECT txt1 FROM T1 WHERE txt1 LIKE '_a\%' then? –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 4:20
    
Yes. The _ wildcard will match any single character, including the _ literal. I'd recommend trying this sort of thing out in a local database. There is no substitute for some good, old-fashioned trial and error. –  chrislopresto Mar 5 '13 at 4:56
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The LIKE clause allows you to find text when you don't know the exact value, such as names beginning with JO would be

LIKE 'JO%'

However, if you are search for something ending with a%, then you need to tell SQL to treat the % as part of what you are searching for. In your example, you are looking for a 3 character string, you don't care what the first letter is, but has to end with a%.

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like 'JO%' will find words starting with JO, my doubt is not about the use of %, but the use of the backslash –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 2:10
    
Sorry, typo, thanks –  Sparky Mar 5 '13 at 2:11
    
do you know anything about \ ?? –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 2:13
    
Which SQL are you using (Microsoft, Oracle, mySQL, etc.) –  Sparky Mar 5 '13 at 2:17
    
none, it's a question from a test :/ it's just a generic query –  Polux Mar 5 '13 at 2:19
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