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I need to create program that takes the originalText and replaces each letter in the originalText with a new specific letter then prints it out as mixedLetterText.

This is what I have but it only works for the first "String mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('a', 'w');" and doesn't change any of the other letter. I am very new to all of this and just don't know what is wrong... anyway thanks! Please help.

public class MixLettersAndNumbers

    public static void main(String[] args)

        String originalText = "as we walk";

        String mixedLetterText = 
        originalText.replace('a', 'w');
        originalText.replace('s', 'e');
        originalText.replace('d', 'r');
        originalText.replace('f', 't');
        originalText.replace('g', 'y');
        originalText.replace('h', 'u');
        originalText.replace('j', 'i');
        originalText.replace('k', 'o');
        originalText.replace('l', 'p');
        originalText.replace('z', 's');
        originalText.replace('x', 'd');
        originalText.replace('c', 'f');
        originalText.replace('v', 'g');
        originalText.replace('b', 'h');
        originalText.replace('n', 'j');
        originalText.replace('m', 'k');   
        originalText.replace('q', '1');
        originalText.replace('w', '2');
        originalText.replace('e', '3');
        originalText.replace('r', '4');
        originalText.replace('t', '5');
        originalText.replace('y', '6');
        originalText.replace('u', '7');
        originalText.replace('i', '8');
        originalText.replace('o', '9');
        originalText.replace('p', '0');

        //test it out
        System.out.println("original = " + originalText);
        System.out.println("mixed = " + mixedLetterText);
share|improve this question
Is it possible this is mistagged? looks like Java not javascript. – Zeke Alexandre Nierenberg Mar 5 '13 at 3:12
Agree, this is not JavaScript. I'm not familiar with Java, but it seems that you would have to put String mixedLetterText = before every replace statement. Although I'm sure someone's got a better solution. – Fabian Lauer Mar 5 '13 at 3:34

3 Answers 3

Replace all (similar) lines from:

originalText.replace('h', 'u');


originalText = originalText.replace('h', 'u');

The replace() function will return a modified version of text.

At last, the variable originalText will contain modified version of the text.

That is to say,

// no need to use mixedLetterText if you are not intended to keep originalText
originalText = originalText.replace('a', 'w');
originalText = originalText.replace('s', 'e');
originalText = originalText.replace('d', 'r');
originalText = originalText.replace('f', 't');
originalText = originalText.replace('g', 'y');

... and so on

share|improve this answer
this did work but @kolink was still right that some of them don't work because they repeat. Is there a quick fix for this? – LucasA618 Mar 5 '13 at 3:48
yes. re-arrange the order of replacement – Raptor Mar 5 '13 at 3:56

Is this Java or JavaScript? Java is to JavaScript as ham is to hamster.

Anyway, your code literally says "assign the first replacement to mixedLetterText, then compute all the other replacements one by one and throw them away".

Depending on how you want it to work, you can either just chain the replacements:

String mixedLetterText = originalText

However, keep in mind that if you have crossovers, you might have issues. For example, with your code in a chain, if the input is g then the output will be 6, not y like you might expect.

If you are working in Java, then this question will help find a function to do the conversion. If it is JavaScript, then this function will help.

share|improve this answer
you are correct... g does print 6 not y. any way to quick fix that? – LucasA618 Mar 5 '13 at 3:41

In your code you are just trying to change the original text once. Make these changes

String  mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('s', 'e');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('d', 'r');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('f', 't');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('g', 'y');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('h', 'u');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('j', 'i');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('k', 'o');
mixedLetterText= originalText.replace('l', 'p');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('z', 's');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('x', 'd');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('c', 'f');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('v', 'g');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('b', 'h');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('n', 'j');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('m', 'k');   
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('q', '1');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('w', '2');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('e', '3');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('r', '4');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('t', '5');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('y', '6');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('u', '7');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('i', '8');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('o', '9');
mixedLetterText=originalText.replace('p', '0');
share|improve this answer
this is incorrect. only the last line is effective. – Raptor Mar 5 '13 at 3:54
yeah you are correct I forget to assign it again to the same string – Prakash Mar 5 '13 at 5:37

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