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I need to find the number of files in a directory with my C program but I am having trouble saving the number. I am using the system command and not having any luck.

n = system( " ls | wc -l " ) ;

system does not seem to return a number so I am kinda stuck at this point. Any ideas?

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system does return a number. What exactly do you expect to get as a return value in your case? –  Sebastian Mar 5 '13 at 3:39
    
the number of files –  X_Trust Mar 5 '13 at 3:41
1  
see: stackoverflow.com/questions/4324114/… This explains how to capture the output and read from it as if a file. –  Keith Mar 5 '13 at 3:42
    
the number of files is the output of the command you are running not its return value. system() returns the return value of the command –  Sebastian Mar 5 '13 at 3:43

2 Answers 2

you should use the scandir POSIX function.

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/scandir.html

An example

#include <dirent.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct dirent **namelist;
int n;
n = scandir(".", &namelist, 0, alphasort);
printf("%d files\n", n);

When you are programming C code using Unix functions, POSIX functions are the standard way to do this. You can implement your own ls functions in a standard way.

Enjoy!

NOTE: you can define a selector to use in scandir, for example, to get only the non directory results

int selector (struct dirent * entry)
{
   return (entry->d_type != 4);
}

For more options type, visit: http://www.gsp.com/cgi-bin/man.cgi?topic=dirent

Then you can scan your directory using your custom selector (and sort method):

n = scandir(".", &namelist, selector, alphasort);
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In addition, it would be wise to check scandir's return value to determine success/failure as documented by the opengroup link above. –  undefined behaviour Mar 5 '13 at 4:06

If your question is about counting files, then better to do it using C library functions, if possible, like @Arnaldog illustrates.

However, if your question is about retrieving output from executed child processes, popen(3)/pclose(3) (conforming to POSIX.1-2001) are your friends. The function popen() return FILE pointer that you can use just like that returned by fopen(), just need to remember to close the stream using pclose() to avoid resource leak.

Simple illustration:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int n;
    FILE * pf = popen("ls | wc -l", "r");
    if (pf == (FILE *) 0) {
         fprintf(stderr, "Error with popen - %m\n");
         pclose(pf);
         return -1;
    }
    if (fscanf(pf, "%d", &n) != 1) {
         fprintf(stderr, "Unexpected output from pipe...\n");
         pclose(pf);
         return -1;
    }
    printf("Number of files: %d\n", n);
    pclose(pf);
    return 0;
}
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