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Let's say I have a function that looks like this:

var meowLikeACat = function(howoften) { 
    setInterval(function() { 
        alert("meow"); 
    },howoften*1000) 
}

and let's say that i'm calling it like this:

var howOften_local = 3;
meowLikeACat(howOften_local+1);

At what point does that +1 operation actually occur?

And would it be possible to 'intercept' the data that was being passed before the function ran?

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4  
What do you think is happening? Some simple console.log statements can probably answer it. –  epascarello Mar 5 '13 at 3:51
    
@epascarello how is that relevant? –  Martin Mar 5 '13 at 3:51
    
@Xander well I wrote out 3 other ways that i thought it could happen –  Michael Zaporozhets Mar 5 '13 at 3:53
2  
I don't understand the difference between your first two dot, points. The parameters are passed when the function is called. –  nnnnnn Mar 5 '13 at 3:56
    
@nnnnnn I agree; I said as much in my answer. –  Matt Ball Mar 5 '13 at 3:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

At what point does that +1 operation actually occur?

All parameters are evaluated, left-to-right, immediately before being passed to the function.

11.2.3 Function Calls

The production CallExpression : MemberExpression *Arguments* is evaluated as follows:

  1. Let ref be the result of evaluating MemberExpression.
  2. Let func be GetValue(ref).
  3. Let argList be the result of evaluating Arguments, producing an internal list of argument values (see 11.2.4).
  4. If Type(func) is not Object, throw a TypeError exception.
  5. If IsCallable(func) is false, throw a TypeError exception.
  6. If Type(ref) is Reference, then
    a. If IsPropertyReference(ref) is true, then
        i. Let thisValue be GetBase(ref).
    b. Else, the base of ref is an Environment Record
        i. Let thisValue be the result of calling the ImplicitThisValue concrete method of GetBase(ref).
  7. Else, Type(ref) is not Reference.
    a. Let thisValue be undefined.
  8. Return the result of calling the [[Call]] internal method on func, providing thisValue as the this value and providing the list argList as the argument values.

11.2.4 Argument Lists

The evaluation of an argument list produces a List of values (see 8.8).

The production Arguments : ( ) is evaluated as follows:

  1. Return an empty List.

The production Arguments : ( ArgumentList ) is evaluated as follows:

  1. Return the result of evaluating ArgumentList.

The production ArgumentList : AssignmentExpression is evaluated as follows:

  1. Let ref be the result of evaluating AssignmentExpression.
  2. Let arg be GetValue(ref)
  3. Return a List whose sole item is arg.

The production ArgumentList : ArgumentList , AssignmentExpression is evaluated as follows:

  1. Let precedingArgs be the result of evaluating ArgumentList.
  2. Let ref be the result of evaluating AssignmentExpression.
  3. Let arg be GetValue(ref).
  4. Return a List whose length is one greater than the length of precedingArgs and whose items are the items of precedingArgs, in order, followed at the end by arg which is the last item of the new list.

And would there be any way of forcing the operation to occur in any of the above?

The first two are the same. I don't see how you could distinguish between the time when a function is called and the time when a parameter is passed to the function.

You could accomplish the third by passing a function instead:

function meowLikeACat(howoften) {
    setInterval(function() { 
        alert("meow"); 
    }, howoften()*1000) 
}

var howOften_local = 3;
meowLikeACat(function () {
    return howOften_local+1;
});

And would it be possible to 'intercept' the data that was being passed before the function ran?

This is simple, if your code assumes cooperation rather than hostility:

function meowLikeACat(howoften) { 
    setInterval(function() { 
        alert("meow"); 
    }, howoften*1000) 
}

function intercept(thisArg, original, before) {
    return function() {
        // could manipulate arguments here,
        // or pass something completely different to original
        before.apply(thisArg, arguments);
        original.apply(thisArg, arguments);
    };
}

function doBefore() {
    console.log('before', arguments);
}

var meowLikeACatIntercepted = intercept(null, meowLikeACat, doBefore);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/e4AY6

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I kind of mis-worded my last question initially, there's an edit though :) –  Michael Zaporozhets Mar 5 '13 at 4:01
    
@Mikey see my last edit for a response. –  Matt Ball Mar 5 '13 at 4:22
    
wow, well this was ridiculously well explained, thanks a tonne coolcat! –  Michael Zaporozhets Mar 5 '13 at 4:23
    
My pleasure. :) –  Matt Ball Mar 5 '13 at 4:25

It happens on the spot.

var howOften_local = 3;
meowLikeACat(howOften_local+1);

This code is basically doing it like:

meowLikeACat(4);
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