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The problem that I'm trying to solve is the following:

Given n dollars, you have unlimited pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters, calculate the total number of ways to represent n.

I've come up with a recursive solution (let's just assume n is 0.25 dollar so the output is not some ridiculous number):

def changes(w, x, y, z)
  if 0.01 * w + 0.05 * x + 0.1 * y + 0.25 * z > 0.25
    return
  elsif 0.01 * w + 0.05 * x + 0.1 * y + 0.25 * z == 0.25
    @@counter += 1
    puts "w: #{w} x: #{x} y: #{y} z: #{z}"
  else
    changes(w + 1, x, y, z)
    changes(w, x + 1, y, z)
    changes(w, x, y + 1, z)
    changes(w, x, y, z + 1)
  end
end

@@counter = 0
changes(0, 0, 0, 0)
puts @@counter

Basically the idea here is increment the counter when there is a match, otherwise try the next possible denomination.

But in the output there's a lot of repetitions like:

w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 10 x: 1 y: 1 z: 0
w: 15 x: 0 y: 1 z: 0
w: 10 x: 1 y: 1 z: 0

Can somebody tell me why? In my recursion don't I always pass in parameters with different values? How come the same values get printed multiple times?

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let me rewrite your code with some explanations:

@variants = []
def changes(w, x, y, z)
  case 0.01 * w + 0.05 * x + 0.1 * y + 0.25 * z 
  when 0...0.25
    changes(w + 1, x, y, z)
    changes(w, x + 1, y, z)
    changes(w, x, y + 1, z)
    changes(w, x, y, z + 1)
  when 0.25
    @variants << [w,x,y,z] unless @variants.include?([w,x,y,z])
  end 
end

changes(0, 0, 0, 0)
puts @variants.size
@variants.each { |v| puts "w: #{v[0]} x: #{v[1]} y: #{v[2]} z: #{v[3]}" }

The main idea that you add a variant to counted if and only it’s not counted yet. The dups became from the fact, that there are different ways to reach a state [w=1,x=1]: [0,0]⇒[0,1]⇒[1,1] and [0,0]⇒[1,0]⇒[1,1] (note the middle chain link.) case is more evident here than a spaghetti of if-elsif-end.

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Just an example on how you would get duplicates

On your first call with changes(0, 0, 0, 0).
It will fail and call:

changes(1, 0, 0, 0) # a
changes(0, 1, 0, 0) # b
changes(0, 0, 1, 0) # c
changes(0, 0, 0, 1) # d

a will then fail and call

changes(2, 0, 0, 0) # aa
changes(1, 1, 0, 0) # ab
changes(1, 0, 1, 0) # ac
changes(1, 0, 0, 1) # ad

at the same time, b will then fail and call

changes(1, 1, 0, 0) # ba
changes(0, 2, 0, 0) # bb
changes(0, 1, 1, 0) # bc
changes(0, 1, 0, 1) # bd

As you can see, ab and ba uses the same parameters. Etc with ac/ca...

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