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How can I detect a member function has const modifier or not?

Consider the code

struct A {
  int member();
  int member() const;
};

typedef int (A::*PtrToMember)();
typedef int (A::*PtrToConstMember)() const;

I need something like this:

std::is_const<PtrToMember>::value // evaluating to false
std::is_const<PtrToConstMember>::value // evaluating to true 
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1  
Should you not know the data types you are dealing with when you are writing the code? –  Ed Heal Mar 5 '13 at 5:58
1  
aren't constness of member function checked at compile time? –  zzk Mar 5 '13 at 6:01
2  
@EdHeal What if it's a template argument? Then you don't know until the instantiation. Imagine that you want to use it in an enable_if. –  Agentlien Mar 5 '13 at 6:31
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There you go:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
struct is_const_mem_fn {
private:
    template<typename U>
    struct Tester {
        static_assert( // will always fail
            std::is_member_function_pointer<U>::value,
            "Use member function pointers only!");

        // if you want to report false for types other than
        // member function pointers you can just derive from
        // std::false_type instead of asserting
    };

    template<typename R, typename U, typename...Args>
    struct Tester<R (U::*)(Args...)> : std::false_type {};

    template<typename R, typename U, typename...Args>
    struct Tester<R (U::*)(Args...) const> : std::true_type {};

public:
    static const bool value =
        Tester<typename std::remove_cv<T>::type>::value;
};

struct A {
  int member();
  int member() const;
};
typedef int (A::*PtrToMember)();
typedef int (A::*PtrToConstMember)() const;

int main()
{
    std::cout
        << is_const_mem_fn<PtrToMember>::value
        << is_const_mem_fn<const PtrToMember>::value
        << is_const_mem_fn<PtrToConstMember>::value
        << is_const_mem_fn<const volatile PtrToConstMember>::value
        << is_const_mem_fn<decltype(&std::vector<int>::size)>::value;
}

Output: 00111

EDIT: There's a corner case I forgot to account for in the original answer.

The trait above will choke on a hypothetical member function like this:

struct A {
  int member(int, ...) const;
};

because there is no valid specialization of Tester that can be generated for such signature. To fix it, add the following specializations:

template<typename R, typename U, typename...Args>
struct Tester<R (U::*)(Args..., ...)> : std::false_type {};

template<typename R, typename U, typename...Args>
struct Tester<R (U::*)(Args..., ...) const> : std::true_type {};
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Works fine with gcc. Thanks! –  Akon Mar 5 '13 at 10:50
    
@Akon You're welcome. Please check the updated answer, too. –  jrok Mar 5 '13 at 17:40
    
Thank you again for deep look on my question. –  Akon Mar 6 '13 at 5:02
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Below is a simple type trait adapted from here that should allow this.

template <typename T>
struct is_const_mem_func : std::false_type { };

template <typename Ret, typename Class, typename... Args>
struct is_const_mem_func<Ret (Class::*)(Args...) const> : std::true_type { };
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2  
Valid for PtrToMember, const PtrToMember and PtrToConstMember. BUT wrong for const PtrToConstMember –  M M. Mar 5 '13 at 8:21
    
Right way. Thanks! –  Akon Mar 5 '13 at 10:52
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