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I'm writing a project that captures Java keywords from a .java file and keeps track of the occurrences with a map. I've used a similar method in the past successfully, but I can't seem to adopt this method for my intended use here.

    Map<String,Integer> map = new TreeMap<String,Integer>();
    Set<String> keywordSet = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(keywords));
    Scanner input = new Scanner(file);
    int counter = 0;
    while (input.hasNext())
    {
        String key = input.next();
        if (key.length() > 0)
        {
            if (keywordSet.contains(key))
            {
                map.put(key, 1);
                counter++;
            }

                if(map.containsKey(key)) <--tried inner loop here, failed
                {
                    int value = map.get(key);
                    value++;
                    map.put(key, value);
                }

        }

This block of code is supposed to add the keyword to the key, and increment the value each time the same key occurs. So far, it adds the keywords, but fails to properly increment the value. here is a sample output:

{assert=2, class=2, continue=2, default=2, else=2, ...} 

Basically it increments every value in the map instead of the ones it's supposed to. I'm not sure if I'm over-thinking this or what. I've tried an inner loop and it gave me insane results. I really hope I'm just over-thinking this. Any help is greatly appreciated!

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Maybe it just put 2 on every insert? cause you insert 1 in first if and increment in the second if –  BobTheBuilder Mar 5 '13 at 6:48
    
    
@PawełWyrwiński, maybe such a micro benchmark analysis is way, way, WAY too complex for this context. Before making it fast, one needs to make it right. –  Bruno Reis Mar 5 '13 at 7:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For every key you scan you create a new entry in the map (overriding the existing one). Then, the next condition holds so you increment the count by 1, reaching the value 2.

The inner part should be something like:

        if (keywordSet.contains(key))
        {
            Integer value = map.get(key);
            if (value == null)
                value = 0;
            value++;
            map.put(key, value);
        }

Anyway, consider using some kind of a mutable integer to make this more efficient. You won't have to override entries in the map, and you won't be doing too much Integer boxing operations.

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You insert 2 for new entries –  BobTheBuilder Mar 5 '13 at 6:57
    
@baraky: Thanks, fixed –  Eyal Schneider Mar 5 '13 at 6:59

There's a much more concise (and easier to reason about) way to achieve what you want:

final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicInteger> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<>();
final Scanner input = new Scanner(file);
while (input.hasNext()) {
  final String key = input.next();
  if (key.length() > 0) {
    map.putIfAbsent(key, new AtomicInteger(0));
    map.get(key).incrementAndGet();
  }
}

Let's analyze why does this work.

Whenever the Scanner encounters a keyword, there are 2 possible cases: you either have encountered it before (ie, it is a known keyword), or it is an yet unseen keyword.

  • If it is an unseen keyword: putIfAbsent will put an AtomicInteger with value 0 in the map, and incrementAndGet() will set it to 1 right after, and, from now on, it becomes a known keyword;
  • If it is a known keyword: putIfAbsent will do nothing, and incrementAndGet() will increment the value that is already present in the map.

Then, if you want the key set, you do:

final Set<String> keys = map.keySet();

To print all the values, you could do something like:

for (final String k : map.keySet()) {
  System.out.println(k + ": " + map.get(k).get());
}

You are not forced to use the two "different" classes I used above, ConcurrentMap and AtomicInteger. It is just easier to use them because they encapsulate much of the logic that you tried to write by yourself (and failed). The logic that they encapsulate is exactly all the other answers describe (ie, test if the value is present, if not set it to 0, then get whatever value is present, increment it and put it back into the map).

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Question; wouldn't the classes out the java.util.concurrent package be slower to use if the concurrency is necessary? –  posdef Jan 27 at 9:20
    
I would benchmark to make sure. But my initial thinking is that they wouldn't have a big impact in performance. Reasons being, most of the Java Concurrency classes are highly optimized in a "optimistic" way, they use operations that assume no contention and retry if there was some kind of simultaneous access (i.e., they avoid locking but rely on "compare-and-set" primitives quite often). But the only way to tell is micro-benchmarking, which is a problematic concept in itself... –  Bruno Reis Jan 27 at 22:31
    
Thanks for the reply, I just realized a typo in my question; I meant to ask if "no" concurrency is necessary. In other words, if there's no concurrent access to the collections, then methods that synchronize should essentially slower than their counterparts that don't, intuitively speaking. –  posdef Jan 28 at 10:15

You always set the value to 1 and then update it by another one. What you need is to update the map value (and not setting it to 1 again).

Instead of:

map.put(key, 1);

use:

Integer value = map.get(key);
if (value == null){
    value = 0
}
value++;
map.put(key, value);

And drop the second if.

share|improve this answer
Map<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
Set<String> keywordSet = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(keywords));
Scanner input = new Scanner(file);

while (input.hasNext()){
     String key = input.next();
     if (key.length() > 0)
        if (keywordSet.contains(key)){
           Integer counter = map.get(key);

           if (counter == null)
               map.put(key, 1);
           else
               map.put(key, count + 1);
         }
}
share|improve this answer

Even more concise using Map.merge() (Java 8):

if (keywordSet.contains(key)) {
    map.merge(key, 1, (v, vv) -> ++v);
}
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