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class c1
{
   public $table;
   private $db;
   public function __construct ($table)
   {
        $this->table = $table;
        $this->db = new Database();
   }

   public function f1()
   {
       echo $this->table;
       echo $this->db;
   }

}

//In another file:

class c2 extends c1
{
   public function __construct ($something)
    {
        parent::__construct("users");
    }
   public function f2()
   {
       parent::f1();
   }
}

Now i am new to PHP and i need a few things straightened out:

if c2 extends c1 shouldn't c2 have access to c1 functions and variables ?If insteat of parent::f1() i call just f1()/* i did this in the beggining thinking if i extend the c1 class i'll be able to call f1 with no problems*/ i get the following error msg :Call to undefined function f1();

tried calling $this->f1(); I get : Using $this when not in object context

using self::f1() works but now i get the following error msg Using $this when not in object context in f1 //the line where i try to echo $this->table

replacing $this->table with self::$table i get Undefined class constant 'table'

Please help me to understand what class variables are all about and what the hell i'm doing wrong when i try to acces these variables

share|improve this question
    
    
You are instantiating a class first, right? You need to do $object = new c2(); and then call methods on the object itself, eg $object->f2(); –  Crisp Mar 5 '13 at 7:16
    
Use $this when in object context and self when you access a static method or property. –  Sid Mar 5 '13 at 7:32
    

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