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I am using the following code in Java to print out various properties of Google's certificate.

import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSession;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSocket;
import javax.net.SocketFactory;

import java.io.*;
import java.math.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.security.*;

import javax.net.*;
import javax.security.cert.X509Certificate;

/*
 * Start an connection with google.com and submit to Google to figure out how to get the certificate.
 * Should not pull from artificial context.
 */
public class MWE{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{
        SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getDefault();
        SocketFactory clientSocketFactory = sslContext.getSocketFactory();

        String remoteHost = "google.com";
        int remotePort = 443;
        SSLSocket socket = null;
        try {
            //Lookup the "common name" field of the certificate from the remote server:
            socket = (SSLSocket) clientSocketFactory.createSocket(remoteHost, remotePort);
            socket.setEnabledCipherSuites(socket.getSupportedCipherSuites());
            socket.startHandshake();
        } catch (IOException ioe) {
            ioe.printStackTrace();
        }
        X509Certificate[] c = socket.getSession().getPeerCertificateChain();
        X509Certificate serverCertificate = c[0]; //can I control which instance of this is used?
        Principal serverDN = serverCertificate.getSubjectDN();
        BigInteger serverSerialNumber = serverCertificate.getSerialNumber();

        System.out.println(serverCertificate.getClass());
        System.out.println(serverDN);
        System.out.println(serverSerialNumber.toString(16));
        System.out.println(serverCertificate.getSigAlgName());

        System.out.println(serverCertificate.getNotBefore());
        System.out.println(serverCertificate.getNotAfter());
    }
}

The output I get looks like this:

CN=*.google.com, O=Google Inc, L=Mountain View, ST=California, C=US
1484d9a3000000007d35
SHA1withRSA
Wed Feb 20 05:34:43 PST 2013
Fri Jun 07 12:43:27 PDT 2013

However, when I view the certificate from Firefox or Chrome, everything matches except the serial number.

enter image description here

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Firefox certificate info shows the certificate for www.google.com, while your Java code displays the certificate for google.com.

Those two sites have different certificates, and therefore different serials.

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