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I need to get the date which could be in 3 possible format.

  1. 11/20/2012
  2. 11.20.2012
  3. 11-20-2012

How could I achieve this in Perl. I'm trying RegEx to get what I want. Here's my code.

my @dates = ("Mon 11/20/2012","2012.11.20","20-11-2012"); #array values may vary in every run 
foreach my $date (@dates){
    $date =~ /[-.\/\d+]/g;
    print "Date: $date \n";
}

I want the output to be. (code above doesn't print anything)

Date: 11/20/2012
Date: 2012.11.20
Date: 20-11-2012

Where am I wrong? Please Help. Thanks

Note: I want to achieve this without using any CPAN module as much as possible. I know there are a lot of CPAN modules that could provide what I want.

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1  
There is no (valid) reason not to use modules. There's also core modules that handle time. –  TLP Mar 5 '13 at 7:46
    
@TLP It is a limitation on my side. I can't install a module on a cygwin Perl since I don't own the permission. It would take some months/years to repackage the cygwin Perl. I just want the script to be available as soon as possible. It is really just a complication on my side. –  quinekxi Mar 5 '13 at 7:55
    
Your code works as expected!! Whats the problem you faced? –  Krishnachandra Sharma Mar 5 '13 at 7:58
1  
Have to agree with @KrishnachandraSharma the code does output close to what you want. Though only because it does not change your array in any way shape or form. –  TLP Mar 5 '13 at 8:00
    
Yeah right, it works as expected. My bad, I forgot to print the dates on the actual code. –  quinekxi Mar 5 '13 at 8:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code almost produces what you want. I assume your input is a bit more complicated, or you have posted code that you are not actually running.

Either way, the problem is this

$date =~ /[-.\/\d+]/g;

First off, your plus multiplier is inside the character class: It should be after it. Second, it is just a pattern match, you need to use it in list context, and store its return value:

my ($match) = $date =~ /[-.\/\d]+/g;
print "Date: $match\n";

Then it will return the first of the strings found that contains one or more of dash, period, slash or a number. Be aware that it will match other things as well, as it is a rather unstrict regex.

Why does it work? Because a pattern match in list context returns a list of the matches when the global /g modifier is used.

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Why is it with putting the () in $match doesn't print the date, it only print 1? Otherwise, it works. :D –  quinekxi Mar 5 '13 at 8:13
1  
The application of a regex match m// to a string returns different things depending on the context. In scalar context, it returns 1 or the empty string. In list context - if the /g modifier is used - it returns a list of the matches. Context is determined by the left hand side arguments. $match is a scalar, ($match) is a list of 1 scalar. You can also use parentheses () to capture strings, which will then be returned. –  TLP Mar 5 '13 at 8:17

I highly recommend the use of DateTime::Format::Strptime module, which has a rich set of funcionality. Think not only in parsing strings, but also in checking the date is valid.

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Why not search for the formats one at a time?

=~ m!(\d{2}/\d{2}/\d{2}|\d{4}\.\d{2}\.\d{2}|\d{2}-\d{2}-\d{4})!

should do the trick. Other than that, there's a module dealing with dates called DateTime.

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Try matching the formats in turn. The regex below matches any of your permitted separators (/, ., or -) and then requires the same separator via backreference (\2 or \3). Otherwise, you have three possible separators times two possible positions for the year to make six alternatives in your pattern.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

#array values may vary in every run
my @dates = ("Mon 11/20/2012","2012.11.20","20-11-2012");

my $date_pattern = qr<
  \b  # begin on word boundary
  (
    (?:           [0-9][0-9] ([-/.]) [0-9][0-9] \2 [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9])
  | (?: [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] ([-/.]) [0-9][0-9] \3 [0-9][0-9])
  )
  \b  # end on word boundary
>x;

foreach my $date (@dates) {
  if (my($match) = $date =~ /$date_pattern/) {
    print "Date: $match\n";
  }
}

Output:

Date: 11/20/2012
Date: 2012.11.20
Date: 20-11-2012

On my first try at the code above, I had \2 in the YYYY-MM-DD alternative where I should have had \3, which failed to match. To spare us counting parentheses, version 5.10.0 added named capture buffers.

  • Named Capture Buffers

It is now possible to name capturing parenthesis in a pattern and refer to the captured contents by name. The naming syntax is (?<NAME>....). It's possible to backreference to a named buffer with the \k<NAME> syntax. In code, the new magical hashes %+ and %- can be used to access the contents of the capture buffers.

Using this handy feature, the code above becomes

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use 5.10.0;  # named capture buffers

use strict;
use warnings;

#array values may vary in every run
my @dates = ("Mon 11/20/2012","2012.11.20","20-11-2012");

my $date_pattern = qr!
  \b  # begin on word boundary
  (?<date>
    (?:           [0-9][0-9] (?<sep>[-/.]) [0-9][0-9] \k{sep} [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9])
  | (?: [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] (?<sep>[-/.]) [0-9][0-9] \k{sep} [0-9][0-9])
  )
  \b  # end on word boundary
!x;

foreach my $date (@dates) {
  if ($date =~ /$date_pattern/) {
    print "Date: $+{date}\n";
  }
}

and produces the same output.

The code above still contains a lot of repetition. Using the (DEFINE) special case combined with named captures, we can make the pattern much nicer.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use 5.10.0;

use strict;
use warnings;

#array values may vary in every run
my @dates = ("Mon 11/20/2012","2012.11.20","20-11-2012");

my $date_pattern = qr!
  \b (?<date> (?&YMD) | (?&DMY)) \b

  (?(DEFINE)
    (?<SEP>  [-/.])
    (?<YYYY> [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9])
    (?<MM>   [0-9][0-9])
    (?<DD>   [0-9][0-9])
    (?<YMD>  (?&YYYY) (?<sep>(?&SEP)) (?&MM) \k<sep> (?&DD))
    (?<DMY>  (?&DD)   (?<sep>(?&SEP)) (?&MM) \k<sep> (?&YYYY))
  )
!x;

foreach my $date (@dates) {
  if ($date =~ /$date_pattern/) {
    print "Date: $+{date}\n";
  }
}

Yes, the subpattern named DMY also matches dates int MDY form. For now it suffices, and you ain’t gonna need it.

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