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I do not understand how calling this function works

function setup(x) {
    var i = 0;
    return function () {
        console.log(i);
        return x[i++];

    };
}

var next = setup(['a', 'b', 'c']);

console.log(next());//a
console.log(next());//b
console.log(next());//c

how is i not reset to 0 with each call?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How do JavaScript closures work? – Mike Samuel Mar 5 '13 at 8:15
    
@MikeSamuel I've looked through that post before and it's a little different in that i'm just curious about this particular iterator, not broadly "how do closures work". – thomas Mar 5 '13 at 8:20
    
the first answer to that question will also answer "how is i not reset to 0 with each call?" – Mike Samuel Mar 5 '13 at 8:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your code:

> function setup(x) {
>     var i = 0;

When setup is called, a new execution context is created with local variables x and i. When execution begins, x is assigned a value of the passed array and i is set to zero.

>     return function () {
>         console.log(i);
>         return x[i++];
>     };

This anonymous function is returned. It has a closure to the outer execution object that is placed on its scope chain (so is the global execution object).

So it has a closure to both i and x, whose values can now only be changed by the function.

> }
>
> var next = setup(['a', 'b', 'c']);

The returned function is assigned to next, so it's no longer anonymous.

> 
> console.log(next());//a

When this line executes, next returns x[0], which is "a", and increments i to 1.

> console.log(next());//b

When this line executes, next returns x[1], which is "b", and increments i to 2.

> console.log(next());//c

When this line executes, next returns x[2], which is "c", and increments i to 3.

share|improve this answer
    
"So it has a closure to both i and x, whose values can now only be changed by the function." Okayy. But what prevents i from being reset each time? If I put something like console.log('after i') on the line after var i = 0, and then do the three console.log(next());s I only see the printout of after i one time — JSBIN. I just don't understand how that named function setup() can be called without its executing anything outside the anonymous function on the 2nd and 3rd calls. Sorry to be daft.. :/ – thomas Mar 5 '13 at 16:37
    
i is not reset because setup is only called once. After that, next is called, which assigns a new value (i++) each time. – RobG Mar 5 '13 at 20:48
    
Okay...making more sense. Thank you. so this fiddle example knows that setup is a function because even though next() only points to the returned function, because when it was initially created, it had access to the parent function setup()? It would have access to many layers of "parent" functions? I hope this question is clear. Please let me know if I need to edit it.. – thomas Mar 5 '13 at 20:57
    
Yes. When a function is called, its scope chain is created that has each outer execution context on it. Functions can be nested very deep (e.g. recursion). Identifier resolution is like property resolution, only it's along the scope chain rather than inheritance ([[Prototype]]) chain. – RobG Mar 5 '13 at 22:12

i is not reset, because it was set outside of the function that is assigned to next. In fact in the line directly above it.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't get it. it looks like it's set on the first line of the function that is assigned to next, viz. reset() – thomas Mar 5 '13 at 8:22
    
No, the line var next = setup(['a', 'b', 'c']); calls the setup function, which returns a different anonymous function. i is set outside of that function, so it doesn't get reset. – nfechner Mar 5 '13 at 8:27

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