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In a mysql database for a paid application with a periodic (e.g:monthly) subscription, what is the best way to check for users with an expired subscription and make them inactive? Normally I'd just check in the app if their expiry date is passed, but there are several types of accounts, such as free, trial, etc.. which will not have an expiry period.

I'd like to keep things simple on the client application side of things, and make it that it will only need to check for for an 'active' status, and allow the user to use the app, rather than switch case all the account types and expiry dates. Also the account types might vary in the future depending on the customer's request and if the logic is in the (php) back-end then that would allow updates without needing a new client version.

The table would be something like this:

User ID | Expiry date | Status

The way I'm currently doing things is that I have a cronjob that runs once in a while and update all the users who's expiry date has passed the current time.

To sum it up my question is:

  • Will the current method causing spike loads on the server once we go into production and have a large number of users?
  • Is there is a better, cleaner way to do this? Whether it's a different update method or a different logic for handling active/inactive users and expiry periods?
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1  
you could check when user logs in for the expiry date, and update the status if needed –  Marko D Mar 5 '13 at 9:08
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Maybe I'm being too simplistic here, but why not simply check the expiry date against the current date when the user logs in and use that to determine if they're active? You're already grabbing their data from the database so there's no increased load, and it means you don't have to run an CRON jobs or similar (which really shouldn't add much load to your server from a practical point of view, especially if you run it at unconventional times) –  niaccurshi Mar 5 '13 at 9:08
    
My bad. I forgot one more issue. The problem is that the app is a social networking one, and when a user is inactive, all things posted by him are hidden until he subscribes again. If a user is inactive and never subscribes or log in again then he will remain as active in the database and his posts will still be shown. –  Boon McBoon Mar 5 '13 at 9:20

2 Answers 2

Why not just check to see if the user has not expired when they logon.

i.e. query like

SELECT COUNT(*), expiry IS NULL OR expiry > NOW()
FROM users
WHERE username = ?
AND password = ?

Then check you can check is the username/password combination are correct and if they are that the account has/has not expired. For accounts that do not have an expiry date use NULL.

This has the advantage that only a fraction of the accounts need to be checked on a daily basis (guessing here that when a user logs in they get a session that times out).

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My bad. I forgot one more issue. The problem is that the app is a social networking one, and when a user is inactive, all things posted by him are hidden until he subscribes again. If a user is inactive and never subscribes again then he will remain as active in the database. –  Boon McBoon Mar 5 '13 at 9:19
    
@BoonMcBoon - That is another table with posts being visible. The users table is just to check if they can log in. –  Ed Heal Mar 5 '13 at 9:25
    
The way I have it done is, when another user logs in, the database will return the posts of active users, and not the ones of the inactive users. I don't have an active/inactive posts in the other table, since there are many other things that depend on the user being active, for example, showing up on peoples' friends list, etc.. It's a bit of a rough pickle I know :/ –  Boon McBoon Mar 5 '13 at 9:55

You can create a CRON JOB for this task.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cron

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This is my current periodic implementation. Thank you for the suggestion though :) –  Boon McBoon Mar 5 '13 at 9:53

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