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I'm using JOptionPane in my code and i have this block:

Object[] move = { "Up", "Down" };
Object moveValue = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
"Where do you want to move?", "Input",
JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE, null, move,
move[0]);

I'm using this above block multiple times and I was thinking, is there a way to give

Object[] move;

new values. When I try it like

Object[] move = { "Up", "Down", "Left" };

it says "Duplicate local variable move" and when I try

move = { "Up", "Down", "Left" };

it gives error "Array constants can only be used in initializers".

So is there a way for me to use my variable "move" multiple times?

EDIT:

Bigger part of the code is

        while (true) {
        switch(hero.getPos()) {
        case 1:
            Object[] move = { "Up", "Down" };
            Object moveValue = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                    "Where do you want to move?", "Input",
                    JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE, null, move,
                    move[0]);
            move = null;
            switch ((String) moveValue) {
            case "Üles":
                hero.setPos(hero.getPos() + 1);
                break;
            case "Paremale":
                hero.setPos(hero.getPos() + 5);
                break;
            }
            break;
        case 2:
            System.out.println("Draakon!!!!");
            dragon = new Dragon(1);
            fight = new Fight(hero, dragon);
            break;
        case 3:
            System.out.println("hallo!");
            move = { "Up", "Right", "Left" };

So i have "move" defined on 4th row and also on the last one. Last one gives the error.

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are you reusing the above code inside the same methode? Is the declaration of move inside the methode as well? –  Blank Chisui Mar 5 '13 at 9:20
    
Object[] move = { "Up", "Down", "Left" }; should be valid, are you sure you didn't leave another declaration of move somewhere in the code? Try renaming it to something else and see what happens. –  Nebelmann Mar 5 '13 at 9:21
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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this

Object[] move = { "Up", "Down" };

...

move = new Object[]{ "Up", "Down", "Left" };
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works like this. LinkedList's seemed too hard –  DaddyStrikes Mar 5 '13 at 9:42
    
Yes it works, but keep in mind that in Java there is no dynamic allocation like in C language, in order to increase the size of an array dynamically. What you're doing here is to recreate the array, and of course in this way there is no problem with a 2 or 3-items array. Imagine now you have an array with 1 million items, would you recreate it like this every time you need it in your code when you only have one item to add? Arrays are interesting when your collection size is static, but Lists are done to handle this kind of situation. –  Rob Mar 5 '13 at 10:33
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Try using LinkedList instead of array

see this approach :

   LinkedList<Object> link = new LinkedList<Object>();//needs java.util.*; as import
   link.add("Left");
   link.add("right");
        Object moveValue = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                "Where do you want to move?", "Input",
                JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE, null, link.toArray(),
                link.get(0).toString());
        System.out.println(moveValue);
        link.add("Down");
         moveValue = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,
                "Where do you want to move?", "Input",
                JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE, null, link.toArray(),
                link.get(0).toString());
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You could have more verbose, and unique names for what each move[] variable is for. you could also carefully use blank code blocks to provide a smaller scope:

{
    Object[] move = {...};
    ...
}
...
{
    Object[] move = {...};
    ...
}
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Well,your question could be referenced to java array initialization. When you code likeObject[] move = { "Up", "Down" };,you are supposed to initialize the array statically. So if you try to do move = { "Up", "Down", "Left" }; again,it means you are going to initialize the array again and it's illegal. So you will get an error message. If you want to create a reference to an object array to be used multiple times,you could code like Object[] move=new Object[count] and you have to give the length of the array which is immutable...if you want to change one element of it,by using index or you write another code just like mentioned and set it to the reference. like Object[] move2=new Object[count];move=move2;.

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You should use a list instead, like an ArrayList.

Object[] move = { "Up", "Down" };
ArrayList<Object> list = new ArrayList<>();
for(Object o : move) list.add(o);
// When you need it
list.add("Left");
// To use it with JOptionPane
Object[] finalMoves = list.toArray();
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Try this way

    Object[] move = { "Up", "Down" };

.... some code

    move = { "Up", "Down", "Left" };
share|improve this answer
    
he already tried this and it gives "Array constants can only be used in initializers" –  Harry Joy Mar 5 '13 at 9:21
4  
who upvoted this? its not the right answer as the OP has already tried this and it didn't work. –  R.J Mar 5 '13 at 9:22
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