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I'm aware that live calls bubble up through the doccument and that is why I'm having issues.

Unfortunately I'm using third party libraries that bind elements and would like to create a case in which a click event isn't bubbled up to those elements.

using .click() in combination with eventStopPropogation works just fine, however due to the dynamic nature of the content I need to use either live,on,delegate,etc... Here's a fidddle of my issue. I need to prevent "outer" click from firing when clicking the "inner" div. I can not change the "outer" handler.

Thanks in advance for your help!!

http://jsfiddle.net/99zQM/2/

HTML:

<div id="outer">
    outer
    <div id="inner">
        inner
    </div>
</div>

Javascript:

$("#outer").bind('click',function(e){
   alert("outer clicked"); 
});

$("#inner").live('click',function(e){
   alert("inner clicked"); 
});
share|improve this question
1  
Then why not put event stopPropogation in the inner handler? –  Derek Mar 5 '13 at 9:27
    
@Derek Because when you use .live() the event handler is bound to the document; by the time the delegated event handler function is called the click event for #outer has already fired, and it's too late. –  Anthony Grist Mar 5 '13 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

use on delegate bound to outer and call e.stopPropagation() in inner click handler..this should dothe trick.

try this updated

$("#outer").bind('click',function(e){
  alert("outer clicked"); 
});

$('#outer').on('click',"#inner",function(e){
  e.stopPropagation();
  alert("inner clicked"); 

});

updated fiddle here

share|improve this answer
1  
From the question: "using .click() in combination with eventStopPropogation works just fine, however due to the dynamic nature of the content I need to use either live,on,delegate,etc" - he's working with dynamically added elements, static event handlers aren't an option. –  Anthony Grist Mar 5 '13 at 9:27
    
ok thanks... :)...updated check it out... –  bipen Mar 5 '13 at 9:31
    
ok this is correct given the question. It's made me realise my example didn't reflect on my current issues (need to add a middle div). I will mark this as the correct answer and open another question. –  D.Mill Mar 5 '13 at 9:52
    
sure.. thanks... happy coding.. :) –  bipen Mar 5 '13 at 9:54

As you've already remarked, event delegation hinges on event bubbling and the use of a static element. The issue is complicated because there's nothing between the <div id="inner"> and <div id="outer"> elements, but we can get around that.

Set up a dynamic event handler for click events on the #inner element that's bound to #outer, and call event.stopImmediatePropagation() to prevent other event handlers from being executed. The downside is that this is dependent on the order in which the event handlers are bound, so your delegated event handler for #inner has to be bound before your static event handler for #outer.

$('#outer').on('click', '#inner', function(e) {
    console.log('inner');
    e.stopImmediatePropagation();
}).click(function(e) {
    console.log('outer');  
});

Take a look at this jsFiddle demo.

share|improve this answer

U can use

$("#outer").bind('click',function(e){
   alert("outer clicked"); 
});
$('#outer').on('click',"#inner",function(e){
    e.stopImmediatePropagation();
    alert("inner clicked"); 

});
share|improve this answer

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