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struct sample {
    int x;
    int y;
    int arr[10];
};

int arr2[10] = {0, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2, 2, 1, 5, 5};

int a = 19; 
int b = 22;
struct sample* samp = new sample;
samp->x = a;
samp->y = b;
samp->arr = ??

In the above example, I need to initialize array inside the structure arr[10] with the elements of arr2[10].

How to do it in C++??

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4  
Stop using raw arrays and start using std::vector or std::array. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 5 '13 at 9:28
    
Just in case you didn't take the precedent advice seriously. If you want to do C++, use std::vector, and the standard library containers in general. –  Stephane Rolland Mar 5 '13 at 9:30
    
change your sample-> to samp->. sample is tag name and cant be used like that. –  Koushik Mar 5 '13 at 9:36
    
@Koushik: Fun fact: it can. sample * sample = new struct sample; sample->x = ....;. But yes, one should refrain from naming variables the same as classes. –  Zeta Mar 5 '13 at 9:43
1  
@Zeta i was not referring to whether sample can be used like that or not what i meant was he had declared as sample * samp so here he should use samp and not sample. here in this code sample is just the tag name:-) –  Koushik Mar 5 '13 at 9:47
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closed as too localized by dandan78, billz, Boro, Sindre Sorhus, Graviton Mar 6 '13 at 3:35

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How to do it in C++??

The simplest solution is to use std::copy as was said by others. Do not use memcpy in C++, as std::copy does the same for PODs but also is applicable for non-PODs and just Does The Right Thing. If the type in your array changes one day, you would have to revisit all places where you do such a copy and replace the memcpy. (And you will miss one of the places and have a hard time to find the bug). Using memcpy in C++ has no benefits, so use std::copy from the start.

The better solution would be to use C++ data structures, in this case, use std::array

#include <array>
struct sample {
      int x;
      int y;
      std::array<int, 10> arr; //C++ array instead of plain C array
    };

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 10> arr2 = {0, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2, 2, 1, 5, 5};

    int a = 19; 
    int b = 22;

    // 1: no need to say "struct sample*" since C++98
    // 2: prefer to use smart pointers..
    //sample* samp = new sample; 
    std::unique_ptr<sample> samp(new sample());
    samp->x = a;
    samp->y = b;
    samp->arr = arr2; //it's as easy as it should be!

    // 3: ... so ypu can't forget to delete!
    //delete samp;
}

Edit: I used unique_ptr here, although in this little example you don't need to use heap allocation at all. To bring in Grijesh's initialization in as well:

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 10> arr2 = {0, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2, 2, 1, 5, 5};

    int a = 19; 
    int b = 22;

    sample samp = {a, b, arr2}; //done!
}

no allocation, no cleanup, no element-wise assignment needed.

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ok this is your std::array good :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 5 '13 at 9:57
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Usually one would use std::copy (<algorithm>) for this:

std::copy(std::begin(arr2), std::end(arr2), std::begin(samp->arr));

Note that std::begin() and std::end() (<iterator>) need C++11 support. If your compiler doesn't support C++11 you can provide this functions quite easily yourself or use pointer arithmetics:

std::copy(arr2, arr2 + 10, samp->arr);

That being sad, you should try to use std::vector for dynamic arrays or std::array (c++11) for fixed size arrays.

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you can use memcpy:

memcpy(sample->arr,arr2,sizeof(int) * 10)

But I would suggest using std::vector for both.

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5  
you need: 10 * sizeof(int) –  hannes Mar 5 '13 at 9:28
    
@hannes yes, you are totally correct. –  Lucian Mar 5 '13 at 9:44
    
prefer std::copy over memcpy so you don't have to come back if the type changes to non-POD MyIntType. And vector is dynamic allocation, you don't need that if you know the size and it does not change - std::array is the better container for those cases. –  Arne Mertz Mar 5 '13 at 9:52
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Copy array using for loop,

for(int i=0; i<10; i++) {
    samp->arr[i]=arr2[i];
}
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why use handwritten loops if algorithm can do that? –  Arne Mertz Mar 5 '13 at 9:51
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