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Is it possible to use something like generate_n to create a const vector of, say, random numbers? I couldn't think of a way to do it without deriving vector and doing the assignment in the constructor.

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2  
I know you have an answer for this now, but just FYI deriving vector (or other type in std namespace not specifically intended to be derived) is risky –  boycy Mar 6 '13 at 13:41
    
Thank you @boycy, I was aware it was discouraged. –  Emre Mar 6 '13 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Use a static helper or a lambda if you wish; move semantics / copy elision as pointed out in the comments will make this pretty cheap since all decent compilers will omit a full copy of the vector returned by the helper. Instead they'll just create the code to fill a single vector and then use that one.

std::vector< int > Helper()
{
  const size_t n = 10;
  std::vector< int > x( n );
  std::generate_n( x.begin(), n, someGenerator );
  return x; 
}

const std::vector< int > my_const_vec( Helper() );

here is the lambda version:

const std::vector< int > my_const_vec( [] ()
  {
    const size_t n = 10;
    std::vector< int > x( n );
    std::generate_n( x.begin(), n, someGenerator );
    return x; 
  }() );
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1  
With such a simple helper, most compilers will even elide the copy completely. –  Agentlien Mar 5 '13 at 10:44
1  
By the way, according to the current standard your lambda needs a -> std::vector<int>, I think. –  Christian Rau Mar 6 '13 at 16:38
    
hmm now I'm confused. Tried with gcc4.7 and cl17.00 and they both accept it, but indeed I seem to remember previous versions of both would reject it. –  stijn Mar 6 '13 at 17:03

Encapsulate your initialization into a function and declare it "constexpr" so that you can use it to initialize a const expression.

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3  
No need for a constexpr here, since he doesn't need a compile time constant expression (which a std::vector return can never be, anyway). –  Christian Rau Mar 6 '13 at 16:40

You can use std::transform as well

vector<int> vec(10,1);
transform(vec.begin(), vec.end(), vec.begin(), func);

Where func is:

int func(int i)
{
//return a random generated number 
}
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that's possible, but the OP asks for a single const vector. –  stijn Aug 10 '13 at 19:38
    
@stijn Ohh yes. But I may use a temporary intermediate vector and then assign it to the const vector as even your approach created one in the function being called. –  Saksham Aug 11 '13 at 2:23

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