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How I can quickly remove all rows in table using Entity Framework?

I am currently using:

var rows = from o in dataDb.Table
           select o;
foreach (var row in rows)
{
    dataDb.Table.Remove(row);
}
dataDb.SaveChanges();

However, it takes a long time to execute.

Are there any alternatives?

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5  
Reading the answers I wonder why none of these TRUNCATE adepts worry about foreign key constraints. –  Gert Arnold Apr 3 '14 at 23:40
1  
Or Why so eager to write a SQL solution! We already know it´s faster. –  Ade Alejo Jul 1 '14 at 22:14

9 Answers 9

For those that are googling this and ended up here like me, this is how you currently do it in EF5 and EF6:

context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [TableName]");

Assuming context is a System.Data.Entity.DbContext

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1  
i use this also, it works fun! –  paul cheung Aug 29 '14 at 3:08
    
This is the most correct answer from here. –  HellBaby Nov 7 '14 at 12:34
1  
@spoulson I don't believe your assertion is correct on recent versions of SQL Server. Kalen Delaney explains: link –  Steve S Mar 17 at 15:25
1  
FYI, in order to use TRUNCATE the user must have ALTER permission on the table. (stackoverflow.com/questions/4735038/…) –  Alex Mar 19 at 10:57
1  
@Alex Just wasted a ton of time on the error "Cannot find the object MyTable because it does not exist or you do not have permissions." for that exact reason - ALTER permissions are rarely granted to EF apps, and the error message really sends you on a wild goose chase. –  Chris Moschini Mar 31 at 17:41

Using SQL's TRUNCATE TABLE command will be the fastest as it operates on the table and not on individual rows.

dataDb.ExecuteStoreCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [Table]");

Assuming dataDb is a DbContext (not an ObjectContext), you can wrap it and use the method like this:

var objCtx = ((System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.IObjectContextAdapter)dataDb).ObjectContext;
objCtx.ExecuteStoreCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [Table]");
share|improve this answer
    
and me by 4 :). –  Manish Mishra Mar 5 '13 at 9:46
    
Haha, sorry ^_^ –  Rudi Visser Mar 5 '13 at 9:48
    
but when i write it."ExecuteStoreCommand" does not recognized –  Zhenia Mar 5 '13 at 10:01
1  
@Zhenia See my update :) –  Rudi Visser Mar 5 '13 at 10:09
using (var context = new DataDb())
{
     var ctx = ((System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.IObjectContextAdapter)context).ObjectContext;
     ctx.ExecuteStoreCommand(DELETE FROM [TableName] WHERE Name= {0}", Name);
}

or

using (var context = new DataDb())
{
     context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [TableName]");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
but when i write it."query.Delete();" - "Delete" does not recognized –  Zhenia Mar 5 '13 at 10:04
1  
add reference of System.Data.Entity and EntityFrameWork in ur current project –  Manish Mishra Mar 5 '13 at 10:10
    
What extension method is Delete? –  Ade Alejo May 17 '14 at 14:05
    
As far as I know there isn't an extension method Delete on IQueryable -- I'm guessing Manish was using something like EntityFramework.Extended: github.com/loresoft/EntityFramework.Extended –  null May 26 '14 at 9:38
    
I've edited my answer, earlier it was misleading. @null, you are right, this .Delete was a custom extension and in the heat of posting the answer first, totally forgot to mention the definition of this custom .Delete. :) –  Manish Mishra May 26 '14 at 12:28

Let me take shot at this:

Believing that no one would like to be SQL Engine(R/DBM) specific. I went on to make some suppositions:

Since deleting/removing all rows is the objetive. Its most probable it won´t be done so often. And if it is, it´s probably a small dataset.

Then performace "shouldn´t" be such an issue. Assume this context:

public class VotingContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Poll> Polls{get;set;}
    public DbSet<Vote> Votes{get;set;}
    public DbSet<Voter> Voters{get;set;}
    public DbSet<Candidacy> Candidates{get;set;}
}

and we can simply call:

VotingContext.Votes.RemoveRange(VotingContext.Votes);

which can be made "better" via:

public static void Clear<T>(this DbSet<T> dbSet) where T : class
{
    dbSet.RemoveRange(dbSet);
}

Then we can:

VotingContext.Votes.Clear();
VotingContext.Voters.Clear();
VotingContext.Candidacy.Clear();
VotingContext.Polls.Clear();
await VotingTestContext.SaveChangesAsync();

I recently used this approach to clean up my test database for each testcase run (it´s obviously faster than recreating the DB from scrath each time, though i didn´t check the form of the delete commands that were generated).

Cheers! ;)

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Easily the best answer! –  MEMark Sep 18 '14 at 14:35
    
@MEMark: Thanks mate! Just trying to "Overflow the Stack" –  Ade Alejo Oct 2 '14 at 15:05
    
Great answer, speeded up my delete all rows code by a factor of 10! Note that I had to rename the Clear() static extension method to something like ClearDbSet() since I already had another Clear() static extension method defined elsewhere in my project. –  dodgy_coder Mar 19 at 2:43
    
@dodgy_coder renaming isn´t necessary for reason you gave, since the extension method is for DbSet, IDbSet s and not IEnumerable, IList, ICollection, ICache or any other interface that "Clear" would be required. the preference for extension method are the type on which the are defined. but if that reads clearer to you and doesn´t sound redundant, Great!. i´,m glad it helps perfomance wise! Cheers! –  Ade Alejo Mar 28 at 14:08
var all = from c in dataDb.Table select c;
dataDb.Table.RemoveRange(all);
dataDb.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
This only works for EF6 and up. –  Josh Noe Jul 15 '14 at 22:10
    
This should not be used cause you execute a full select and a delete after instead of just a delete. From time-performance view this is a big NOT! –  HellBaby Nov 7 '14 at 12:36
    
@HellBaby Unless it's a rarely called and thus the performance is quite irrelevant. –  Alex Dec 13 '14 at 14:48

Like Rudi Visser wrote:

Using SQL's TRUNCATE TABLE command will be the fastest as it operates on the table and not on individual rows.

dataDb.ExecuteStoreCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [Table]");

Assuming dataDb is a DbContext (not an ObjectContext), you can wrap it and use the method like this:

var objCtx = ((System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.IObjectContextAdapter)dataDb).ObjectContext; objCtx.ExecuteStoreCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [Table]");

But You have to be shure to use afterwards anywhere a freshly created datacontext - otherwise you'll get entity framework conflicts. Inside the datacontext these entities are still alive when using Truncate table.

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If you wish to clear your entire database.

Because of the foreign-key constraints it matters which sequence the tables are truncated. This is a way to bruteforce this sequence.

    public static void ClearDatabase<T>() where T : DbContext, new()
    {
        using (var context = new T())
        {
            var tableNames = context.Database.SqlQuery<string>("SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE' AND TABLE_NAME NOT LIKE '%Migration%'").ToList();
            foreach (var tableName in tableNames)
            {
                foreach (var t in tableNames)
                {
                    try
                    {

                        if (context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(string.Format("TRUNCATE TABLE [{0}]", tableName)) == 1)
                            break;

                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {

                    }
                }
            }

            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }

usage:

ClearDatabase<ApplicationDbContext>();

remember to reinstantiate your DbContext after this.

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if

      using(var db = new MyDbContext())
            {
               await db.Database.ExecuteSqlCommandAsync(@"TRUNCATE TABLE MyTable"););
            }

causes

Cannot truncate table 'MyTable' because it is being referenced by a FOREIGN KEY constraint.

I use this :

      using(var db = new MyDbContext())
               {
                   await db.Database.ExecuteSqlCommandAsync(@"DELETE FROM MyTable WHERE ID != -1");
               }
share|improve this answer

This works Properly in EF 5:

YourEntityModel myEntities = new YourEntityModel();

var objCtx = ((IObjectContextAdapter)myEntities).ObjectContext;
objCtx.ExecuteStoreCommand("TRUNCATE TABLE [TableName]");
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