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I am trying to create a table for users and their permissions. The way I did is I created a table called Users and this table has the following fields:

UserID: The identity of each user. Password: The password that a user signs with. Permission: This consists of the following:

if the permission that is given to the user is 1001, the user can view data (a screen will appear with two options: the first option is to view the data of current projects, the second option is to view the data of past projects). if the permission that is given to the user is 1002, the user can insert and view data. if the permission that is given to the user is 1003, the user can view, insert and update data.

Through my searching about permissions in SQL, I found out that this way is not a good way, in other words it is not professional. Can you please guys give me your opinion about what I have done? IF you think it is not a good way, please suggest me some professional methods.

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you can use bitwise permission mask to specify which functions the user can access, or a relational table can be used. –  Raptor Mar 5 '13 at 10:01
    
Note also that you should not be storing Passwords in plain-text. You should stored them as a "salted hash" - Google that for lots of information. –  RB. Mar 5 '13 at 10:03
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I will use a different approach.

Add another table called Permissions

CREATE TABLE Permissions
(
    PermissionID int Not null
    Description nvarchar(255) NOT NULL
)
CONSTRAINT [PK_permissions] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
[PermissionID] ASC
) ON [PRIMARY]

And another one called UserPermissions

CREATE TABLE UserPermissions
(
    UserID int Not Null
    PermissionID int Not null
)
CONSTRAINT [PK_user_permissions] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
      [UserID]ASC,
[PermissionID] ASC
) ON [PRIMARY]

In this way every permission has a proper record and you get the permission allowed for a specific user with a query /stored procedure like this

SELECT u.UserID, p.PermissionID, p.Description 
FROM Users u INNER JOIN UserPermission up on up.UserID = u.UserID
    INNER JOIN Permissions p on up.PermissionID = p.PermissionID

In this way your code could check for individual permissions without need to use a bitmask to isolate the appropriate bit and (while not required by your question) it will be easy to write code to search your database for users that have a particular permission

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