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How can I store an array of doubles to database using Entity Framework Code-First with no impact on the existing code and architecture design?

I've looked at Data Annotation and Fluent API, I've also considered converting the double array to a string of bytes and store that byte to the database in it own column.

I cannot access the public double[] Data { get; set; } property with Fluent API, the error message I then get is:

The type double[] must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T'.

The class where Data is stored is successfully stored in the database, and the relationships to this class. I'm only missing the Data column.

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What does the data represent? Maybe there's a way to tweak your code to make everything work without changing the architecture too much. –  Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:05
    
Or, for a simple fix, could you not make a comma-separated string with all of the double values when writing to the database, then parse the string when you need the values? –  Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:06
    
@NathanWhite going with this comma separated string approach is something we're actually considering. But we would like something more automated from EF. Considering the answers to this tells me that there is no way to automatically say array of doubles to the database with EF. Correct? –  jonas Mar 5 '13 at 10:22
1  
Unfortunately, in EF, an array of primitives is not possible. Consider it if you were to apply an SQL statement to map your database... how would you store an array of doubles anyway? Mapping List<> of objects is possible because EF creates a resolved many-to-many relationship table set. With primitives, this is unfortunately not possible. It would be possible, however, if you created a class specifically to hold a double (with an ID because EF expects it) and have a List<class> in your model. –  Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:37

4 Answers 4

You can do a thing like this :

    [NotMapped]
    public double[] Data
    {
        get
        {
            string[] tab = this.InternalData.Split(',');
            return new double[] { double.Parse(tab[0]), double.Parse(tab[1]) };
        }
        set
        {
            this.InternalData = string.Format("{0},{1}", value[0], value[1]);
        }
    }
    public string InternalData { get; set; }
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1  
you could add the [EditorBrowsable(System.ComponentModel.EditorBrowsableState.Never)] attribute to the internaldata this way you hide it from intellisense. –  Peter Feb 19 at 23:17

I know it is a bit expensive, but you could do this

class Primitive
{
    public int PrimitiveId { get; set; }
    public double Data { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Reference ReferenceClass { get; set; }
}

// This is the class that requires an array of doubles
class Reference
{
    // Other EF stuff

    // EF-acceptable reference to an 'array' of doubles
    public virtual List<Primitive> Data { get; set; }
}

This will now map a single entity (here 'Reference') to a 'list' of your Primitive class. This is basically to allow the SQL database to be happy, and allow you to use your list of data appropriately.

This may not suit your needs, but will be a way to make EF happy.

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It would be far easier if you use List<double> rather then double[]. You already have a table that stores your Data values. You probably have foreign key from some table to the table where your double values are stored. Create another model that reflects the table where doubles are stored and add foreign key mappings in the mappings class. That way you will not need to add some complex background logic which retrieves or stores values in a class property.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Thank you all for your inputs, due to your help I was able to track down the best way to solve this. Which is:

 public string InternalData { get; set; }
 public double[] Data
 {
    get
    {
        return Array.ConvertAll(InternalData.Split(';'), Double.Parse);                
    }
    set
    {
        _data = value;
        InternalData = String.Join(";", _data.Select(p => p.ToString()).ToArray());
    }
 }

Thanks to these stackoverflow posts: String to Doubles array and Array of Doubles to a String

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2  
+1 for posting your final solution –  Jon Rea Apr 1 '14 at 19:16
    
You should mark Joffreys answer as the correct one as he wrote it 2h before you wrote yours, this is just wrong! –  Peter Feb 19 at 23:15
    
@Peter Because he wrote it 2h before I wrote mine doesn't mean that I didn't do my implementation first and then went to this forum and updated this post when I had free time to do so. This post is near two years old, so I'm sorry if I can't account for my actions at that time. As you can see I've even linked to other posts which helped me towards my final solution. But if you think that's wrong then you are entitled to think so. –  jonas Feb 24 at 9:43

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