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Okay so I've started making myself a website for a project that I'm working on. I'm currently sorting out the layout for my website but am stuck on the navbar.

I want my navbar to span 100% of the website, and horizontally/vertically center my buttons (images).

What I've got works ... but I'm just wondering if I'm doing it the most efficient way?

Here is my html.

<div id="wrapper">
  <div id="header">

    <div id="navbar_left">
    </div>

    <div id="navbar_buttons">
        <img src="../Originals/button_home.png" />
        <img src="../Originals/button_logo.png" />
    </div>

    <div id="navbar_right">
    </div>

  </div>
</div>

Here is my CSS:

#wrapper {
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 0;
}

#header {
    height: 123px;
    width: 100%;
    background-image: url(../../Originals/header_background.png);
}

#navbar_left {
    width: 25%;
    height: 123px;
    float: left;
}

#navbar_buttons {
    height: 123px;
    width: 50%;
    float: left;
    line-height: 123px;
    text-align:center;
}

#navbar_buttons::after {
    content: ".";
    visibility: hidden;
}

#navbar_right {
    width: 25%;
    height: 123px;
    float: left;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Check out this jsFiddle for one example of how you could simplify your markup and CSS. It makes use of inline-block for your images.

HTML (using the header element):

<div id="wrapper">
  <header>
    <img src="http://placehold.it/200x100" />
    <img src="http://placehold.it/200x100" />
  </header>
</div>

And CSS:

header {
    text-align: center;
    background: #222;
}
header img {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: bottom;
}

Note that a div is display: block by default, so you don't need to specify the width of 100%: it will fill the available width. Similarly, you don't need to declare a margin or padding as they aren't doing anything.

I'd also avoid declaring a fixed height if you can avoid it: just let your parent div expand to the height of its contents.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Exactly the kind of answer I was looking for :) –  Jared White Mar 6 '13 at 4:02

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