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I'm using the LWJGL library and I am attempting to make a Tetris clone. I was wondering if anyone could give me any pointers because I'm stuck at the coordinates. I have a 277*500 window with 264 tiles. I was planning on making each individual tile independant so I can change the colour of it at will so I could for example make Tetrominoes. However this has been stopped short because I can't figure out how to make each tile idependant. At the moment I have a for loop creating the tiles and I was going to give a value to an array for every addition to the for loop to give each tile an independant array value but I've tested around and can't figure out how to do this. This is the best I have at the moment, a lot of it is just testing and stuff but it's as far as I have gotten.

    package tetris;

import static org.lwjgl.opengl.GL11.*;
import org.lwjgl.LWJGLException;
import org.lwjgl.opengl.*;
import org.lwjgl.input.*;

public class game {

int wx = 277;
int hy = 500;
String score = "0";

public game() throws LWJGLException {

    Display.setDisplayMode(new DisplayMode(wx, hy));
    Display.create();
    Display.setTitle("Tetris");

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho(0, wx, 0, hy, 1, -1);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

        while(!Display.isCloseRequested()) {

            Display.update();
            Display.sync(500);

            simpleText.drawString(score, 3, 3); 

int[][][] coordsTable = new int[][][] {

            //   0          1          2          3          4          5          6          7          8          9          10          11             
/*  0 */    { {  1, 1 }, {  1, 2 }, {  1, 3 }, {  1, 4 }, {  1, 5 }, {  1, 6 }, {  1, 7 }, {  1, 8 }, {  1, 9 }, {  1, 10 }, {  1, 11 }, {  1, 12 } },
/*  1 */    { {  2, 1 }, {  2, 2 }, {  2, 3 }, {  2, 4 }, {  2, 5 }, {  2, 6 }, {  2, 7 }, {  2, 8 }, {  2, 9 }, {  2, 10 }, {  2, 11 }, {  2, 12 } },
/*  2 */    { {  3, 1 }, {  3, 2 }, {  3, 3 }, {  3, 4 }, {  3, 5 }, {  3, 6 }, {  3, 7 }, {  3, 8 }, {  3, 9 }, {  3, 10 }, {  3, 11 }, {  3, 12 } },
/*  3 */    { {  4, 1 }, {  4, 2 }, {  4, 3 }, {  4, 4 }, {  4, 5 }, {  4, 6 }, {  4, 7 }, {  4, 8 }, {  4, 9 }, {  4, 10 }, {  4, 11 }, {  4, 12 } },
/*  4 */    { {  5, 1 }, {  5, 2 }, {  5, 3 }, {  5, 4 }, {  5, 5 }, {  5, 6 }, {  5, 7 }, {  5, 8 }, {  5, 9 }, {  5, 10 }, {  5, 11 }, {  5, 12 } },
/*  5 */    { {  6, 1 }, {  6, 2 }, {  6, 3 }, {  6, 4 }, {  6, 5 }, {  6, 6 }, {  6, 7 }, {  6, 8 }, {  6, 9 }, {  6, 10 }, {  6, 11 }, {  6, 12 } },
/*  6 */    { {  7, 1 }, {  7, 2 }, {  7, 3 }, {  7, 4 }, {  7, 5 }, {  7, 6 }, {  7, 7 }, {  7, 8 }, {  7, 9 }, {  7, 10 }, {  7, 11 }, {  7, 12 } },
/*  7 */    { {  8, 1 }, {  8, 2 }, {  8, 3 }, {  8, 4 }, {  8, 5 }, {  8, 6 }, {  8, 7 }, {  8, 8 }, {  8, 9 }, {  8, 10 }, {  8, 11 }, {  8, 12 } },
/*  8 */    { {  9, 1 }, {  9, 2 }, {  9, 3 }, {  9, 4 }, {  9, 5 }, {  9, 6 }, {  9, 7 }, {  9, 8 }, {  9, 9 }, {  9, 10 }, {  9, 11 }, {  9, 12 } },
/*  9 */    { { 10, 1 }, { 10, 2 }, { 10, 3 }, { 10, 4 }, { 10, 5 }, { 10, 6 }, { 10, 7 }, { 10, 8 }, { 10, 9 }, { 10, 10 }, { 10, 11 }, { 10, 12 } },
/* 10 */    { { 11, 1 }, { 11, 2 }, { 11, 3 }, { 11, 4 }, { 11, 5 }, { 11, 6 }, { 11, 7 }, { 11, 8 }, { 11, 9 }, { 11, 10 }, { 11, 11 }, { 11, 12 } },
/* 11 */    { { 12, 1 }, { 12, 2 }, { 12, 3 }, { 12, 4 }, { 12, 5 }, { 12, 6 }, { 12, 7 }, { 12, 8 }, { 12, 9 }, { 12, 10 }, { 12, 11 }, { 12, 12 } },
/* 12 */    { { 13, 1 }, { 13, 2 }, { 13, 3 }, { 13, 4 }, { 13, 5 }, { 13, 6 }, { 13, 7 }, { 13, 8 }, { 13, 9 }, { 13, 10 }, { 13, 11 }, { 13, 12 } },
/* 13 */    { { 14, 1 }, { 14, 2 }, { 14, 3 }, { 14, 4 }, { 14, 5 }, { 14, 6 }, { 14, 7 }, { 14, 8 }, { 14, 9 }, { 14, 10 }, { 14, 11 }, { 14, 12 } },
/* 14 */    { { 15, 1 }, { 15, 2 }, { 15, 3 }, { 15, 4 }, { 15, 5 }, { 15, 6 }, { 15, 7 }, { 15, 8 }, { 15, 9 }, { 15, 10 }, { 15, 11 }, { 15, 12 } },
/* 15 */    { { 16, 1 }, { 16, 2 }, { 16, 3 }, { 16, 4 }, { 16, 5 }, { 16, 6 }, { 16, 7 }, { 16, 8 }, { 16, 9 }, { 16, 10 }, { 16, 11 }, { 16, 12 } },
/* 16 */    { { 17, 1 }, { 17, 2 }, { 17, 3 }, { 17, 4 }, { 17, 5 }, { 17, 6 }, { 17, 7 }, { 17, 8 }, { 17, 9 }, { 17, 10 }, { 17, 11 }, { 17, 12 } },
/* 17 */    { { 18, 1 }, { 18, 2 }, { 18, 3 }, { 18, 4 }, { 18, 5 }, { 18, 6 }, { 18, 7 }, { 18, 8 }, { 18, 9 }, { 18, 10 }, { 18, 11 }, { 18, 12 } },
/* 18 */    { { 19, 1 }, { 19, 2 }, { 19, 3 }, { 19, 4 }, { 19, 5 }, { 19, 6 }, { 19, 7 }, { 19, 8 }, { 19, 9 }, { 19, 10 }, { 19, 11 }, { 19, 12 } },
/* 19 */    { { 20, 1 }, { 20, 2 }, { 20, 3 }, { 20, 4 }, { 20, 5 }, { 20, 6 }, { 20, 7 }, { 20, 8 }, { 20, 9 }, { 20, 10 }, { 20, 11 }, { 20, 12 } },
/* 20 */    { { 21, 1 }, { 21, 2 }, { 21, 3 }, { 21, 4 }, { 21, 5 }, { 21, 6 }, { 21, 7 }, { 21, 8 }, { 21, 9 }, { 21, 10 }, { 21, 11 }, { 21, 12 } },
/* 21 */    { { 22, 1 }, { 22, 2 }, { 22, 3 }, { 22, 4 }, { 22, 5 }, { 22, 6 }, { 22, 7 }, { 22, 8 }, { 22, 9 }, { 22, 10 }, { 22, 11 }, { 22, 12 } }

};

int[] coords = new int[263];

    for(int j=22; j<hy; j+=22) {
        for(double i=2; i<wx; i+=23) {
            square(i, hy-j, 20.5, 1, 1, 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

public void square(double posX, double posY, double size, float r, float g, float b) {
    glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glVertex2d(posX, posY);
        glVertex2d(posX, posY+size);
        glVertex2d(posX+size, posY+size);
        glVertex2d(posX+size, posY);
        glColor3f(r, g, b);
    glEnd();        
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws LWJGLException {

    new game();
    }
}

Any help would be greatly appreciated! :D

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

There is little point in storing only the X, Y coordinates in a multidimensional array like that, since you would need to know the coordinates in order to get/set anything in the array. You already know where the tiles are, you want to store what the tiles are.

I recently made a match-3 game a few days ago with a not too dissimilar approach. Some tips...

  • Use the array indices to represent the X and Y position of the tile
  • Use a Java object to represent a tile rather than an array (the third level of array you have above)
  • Use the place in the 2D array to track the position of the tiles, but the Tile objects themselves to track properties like color
  • Use null to represent a gap in the tile grid, where there isn't a tile
  • Make the tile grid extend above the top of the visible screen, so its easier to spawn new tetrominoes (this keeps it simpler)
  • Perhaps use a Tetromino class to group tiles together while they are falling, or to represent the different patterns
  • Make the tiles fall by iterating from the bottom of the grid up. If you find a Tile and the cell below it is empty (i.e. null) then move it down. Nice and easy.

Something like this might start you off...

class Tile {
  private Color color;
   ... // getter/setter methods etc...
}

Tile[][] tiles = new Tile[12][22 + 4]; // 4 extra for space to spawn new tiles

// Create a new tetromino - lets say a 1x4 in the middle of the grid
// The first array index will the the X coordinate, and the second the Y coordindate
tiles[6][0] = new Tile(RED);
tiles[6][1] = new Tile(RED);
tiles[6][2] = new Tile(RED);
tiles[6][3] = new Tile(RED);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, does this mean instead of having coordinates for each square, I will have to assign a single value for each square? So instead of a coordinate like (1, 1) it would be 0? Also, with tiles[6][0] for example, assuming this is a shape of a line tetromino, will this remain as [6] and [0] or will this change as it falls and this is just a starting position? It's just that I have looked at other peoples code and they never seem to have a starting position, they do something different that I don't really understand. –  Hayden Perry Mar 5 '13 at 13:51
    
That's why its best to keep it simple at this stage. After you have implemented this you'll understand the problem domain more, and you'll probably be able to come up with a much better solution. As for coordinates, think of the array tiles as a grid on a piece of paper. tiles[6][0] points to the square on the grid at X = 6 and Y = 0. If you don't like the idea of a starting position, you could just use the 2D array to represent fixed tiles, and represent falling tiles in a different way. –  Zutty Mar 5 '13 at 14:52

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