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I am creating a mysql databse in order to serve a high frequented website and I am struggling with the choice of how to rule the access to this DB.. Should every single user of the website have a personnal access to the DB or should the website should access to the DB and serve the clients?

For example, if I have Mike and Stanley users in the website, should I create users 'mike'@'localhost' and 'stanley'@'localhost' in the DB?

Or should I create 'mywebuser'@'localhost' to serve both these clients, having a stored procedure that will check on their ability to access the DB?

Thanks for any idea!

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Should every single user of the website have a personnal access to the DB or should the website should access to the DB and serve the clients? the latter is how it's usually done. User authentication should take place on application level. The big frameworks will help you with that out of the box. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 5 '13 at 11:47
    
What will you store in the database? –  ʎǝɹɟɟɟǝſ Mar 5 '13 at 11:47
    
The DB will store many information such as clients' personal info, their preferences... Which framework should I look into? –  Kruskaal Mar 5 '13 at 13:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For example, if I have Mike and Stanley users in the website, should I create users 'mike'@'localhost' and 'stanley'@'localhost' in the DB?

Or should I create 'mywebuser'@'localhost' to serve both these clients, having a stored procedure that will check on their ability to access the DB?

You definitely want to create a user for your application, not for your application's users. Be sure to grant only the necessary permissions to that user, for security reasons. You might not need CREATE, ALTER or DROP permissions for an application that only INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE and SELECT stuff on your database.

Checking the user's login credentials at mysql connection time would require you to catch C errors thrown during the connection, which is generally a bad practice.

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Thanks a lot for answering. So I should only one user for my application, But then I cannot use the user variables (@var) because their could be conflicts between application users.. Like if mike set @var=2; and then stanley use 'select @var;' he's gonna receive '2' as they are using the same session. –  Kruskaal Mar 5 '13 at 13:14
    
I have checked this problem and finally it appears that session variables will reset if another client connect to the DB through the application because it opens a new session(Obvious you'll tell but it was a little confused in my head..) Thanks a lot! –  Kruskaal Mar 5 '13 at 15:59

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